Station Hill Press

Station Hill of Barrytown, the dedicated project of the not-for-profit Institute for Publishing Arts, is an independent publisher of poetry, poetics, translation, and experimental prose. Our broad focus on innovative works in human alternatives also includes: philosophies and practices of conscious living (including studies in Buddhism, Dzogchen, Zen and Jewish esotericism); alternative health and healing (including acupuncture, bodywork, oriental medicine, mind-body therapies, and cooking). Founded in 1977, Station Hill is located a stone’s throw from the Hudson River in Barrytown, NY, and we are open to the public by appointment.

George Quasha reading at ‘T’ Space (Rhinebeck, New York) on Saturday 7-11-15 his “preverbs” poem for architect José Oubrerie, on the occasion of the latter’s exhibition of The Chapel of the Mosquito.

New and Forthcoming

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America, A Prophecy

Jerome Rothenberg and George Quasha

Celebrated, controversial, influential, this highly unconventional and ground-breaking anthology of American poetry was widely read and taught throughout the 70s and early 80s. Treating the visionary and the experimental as essential American values,  America, A Prophecy maps...

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Jerome Rothenberg and George Quasha

Celebrated, controversial, influential, this highly unconventional and ground-breaking anthology of American poetry was widely read and taught throughout the 70s and early 80s. Treating the visionary and the experimental as essential American values, _America, A Prophecy_ maps diverse poetic forms and literary (and nonliterary) milieus, bringing together poets from all styles and schools, men and women equally; innovative poets (Beats, Black Mountain, etc.) academics, Native Americans, Blacks, Asians, Hispanics. This pre-PC multi-cultural perspective does not push ethnic difference or sameness but explores deeply common concerns and equally valid visions. True to its Blakean title, _America, A Prophecy_ is prophetic of openness to unfamiliar voices and new paths of the poetic art up to 1973 as well as being a timeless primer of poetic possibility.


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Cartographies of Silence

Erik Vatne

Cartographies of Silence comprises over one hundred untitled poem fragments  - what the poet calls "unconscious interruptions" - what navigate maps of being/non-being, writing/speaking/thinking, to reveal the mind-body experience where silence meets language...

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Erik Vatne

Cartographies of Silence comprises over one hundred untitled poem fragments - what the poet calls "unconscious interruptions" - what navigate maps of being/non-being, writing/speaking/thinking, to reveal the mind-body experience where silence meets language.

“Short words, short lines, short poems. How big they are. How Vatne manages to travel so far.” -Robert Kelly

“Something essential known here, neither said nor shown. The word for its absence is remarkably not supplied. Enough space.” -Charles Stein


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Ec(o)logues

Peter Lamborn Wilson

FORTHCOMING June 2011

Of Ec(o)logues, a Menippean Satyre (mixed poetry and prose, mixed serious and humorous) inspired by Virgil’s Eclogues, Charles Stein writes, ""It is my hope that this book will come as something of a revelation to the world of poetry: a revelation that poetry this good and good in this way can be produced in our times; good as rhythmically and sonorously exciting, expressive, intuitive, intelligent, well-measured, suitably barbaric, historically redolent, politically, metaphysically, even soteriologically astute..."

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Peter Lamborn Wilson

"It is my hope that this book by Peter Lamborn Wilson will come as something of a revelation to the world of poetry: a revelation that poetry this good and good in this way can be produced in our times; good as rhythmically and sonorously exciting, expressive, intuitive, intelligent, well-measured, suitably barbaric, historically redolent, politically, metaphysically, even soteriologically astute. A revelation because we are unaccustomed to poetry that is not predominately ironical in statement, excessively self-reflective in attitude, nor committed to the demolition of its own means, that is at once so extraordinarily urbane in spirit and down-home, downright funky in expressive spontaneity, not to mention intellectually complex, with a generous salting of wit and cognitive play. All this, too, without, through naiveté, ignorance, or obtuseness, exposing itself to critical missiles poised like ICBMs to be deployed against work that attempts just what these poems actually achieve.

And I would hazard a reason why: that the stance of the poetry—and Peter Lamborn Wilson has earned his stance through decades of committed prose—that the stance of this poetry, in the complexity of its reflection, the radical specificity of its attentions, and the intensity of its care—is in every breath a committed poetry, and committed in a singular, highly individuated, unpredictable way.
The verse may take its cue from Allen Ginsberg and William Blake, but its intellectual purview shows intimacy with Kropotkin, Proudhon, Engels, Swedenborg, Paracelsus, Agrippa, Erasmus Darwin, Pierre Clastres, Henry Corbin, Charles Fourier, and many others of an equally august if unconventionally referenced notoriety.

Wilson weaves a visionary poetics through an explicit politics, an explicit politics through an exuberant sense of imaginative freedom. Wilson names his political and spiritual agenda “neo-pastoralism” and mines the pastoral tradition of the venerable ancients—Theocritus, Virgil, Edmund Spencer—for material that reprises and expands themes from his previous pronunciamentos: Green Hermeticism, “Escape from the Nineteenth Century,” “The Shamanic Trace,” Pirate Utopias, Temporary Autonomous Zones, to name but a few of his titles.

The poetry is moderated by prose interludes in a variety of genres that develop thoughts in a manner appropriate to the energy of the poetry, not so much by providing conceptual bases for its contents (in a way it does that too), but by the sheer aptness of contiguity and multiplicitous resonance, worked out and placed with an intelligence whose lucidity is as disruptive as the rampant audacity of the verse.

A persistent organizing theme is the hypothesis (due to the late Pierre Clastres) that the historical arrival of “civilization” with its literacy, collectively organized agriculture, division of labor into rulers, administrators, and drones, its authoritarian religion, private property, and massive armies—in short, the advent of The State—came about through the failure of precise social formations that for tens of thousands of years had functioned to ward off and dissipate the agglomeration and centralization of political power. Modern humanity (since 4000 BCE) has invented its own ignorance of the deep human past—and called only what superceded and suppressed it—History. Wilson sets off in search of the traces of social practices now long eclipsed and finds them cannily in the most unlikely places.

The metaphysical posture is pantheism or “pagan monotheism,” aligned with anarchism. The work: to conjure an aggressive pantheism through a veil, haze, or prism of pastoral idealism—the lure of nature realized through the dangerous, bottom-feeding numinosity demonstrably intrinsic to it.

Orthodox (Abrahamic) monotheists routinely slander pantheism, averring that it entails, in practice, a slothful relaxation of the spirit and a general abnegation of conscience: if God is All, what need for moral discipline, intellectual rigor, or the restraint of native delinquency?

But if moral rigor as practiced until now proves to be the absolute repression of the divine in the world and the vassal of Statist discipline, even relaxation and license become tactics for the recovery of natural and divine values. It turns out, however, as any reader of Ec(o)logues may very well attest, that the attentions and affirmations demanded by pantheist-anarchism may prove anything but easily achieved. The affirmation of everything will test the stomach of any of us. It is the discipline and conscience of such an ontological perspective and the transgressive sacrality it entails, that there, where one cannot imagine the sacred, is precisely where one's practice must seek it out. In that sense Ec(o)logues is itself spiritual praxis, for reader and poet alike."

- Charles Stein


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From Trinity to Trinity

Kyoko Hayashi and Eiko Otake, Translator

FROM TRINITY TO TRINITY recounts the pilgrimage of Japanese atomic-bomb survivor Kyoko Hayashi to the Trinity Site in northern New Mexico, where the world’s first atomic bomb test was conducted...

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Kyoko Hayashi and Eiko Otake, Translator

FROM TRINITY TO TRINITY recounts the pilgrimage of Japanese atomic-bomb survivor Kyoko Hayashi to the Trinity Site in northern New Mexico, where the world’s first atomic bomb test was conducted. Her journey takes her into unfamiliar terrain, both past and present, as she not only confronts American attitudes, disconcertingly detached from the suffering of nuclear destruction, but discovers as well a profound kinship with desert plants and animals, the bomb’s “first victims.” Translator Eiko Otake, a renowned artist in dance (Eiko & Koma), offers further insight into Hayashi’s life and work, illuminating how her identity as “outsider” helped shape her vision. Together author and translator present one woman’s transformation from victim to witness, a portrait of endurance as a power of "being" against all odds.


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Squeezed Light

Lissa Wolsak

With the publication of this volume, Lissa Wolsak — who seemingly emerged as a fully-formed poet in the mid-1990s after various other pursuits — emerges for the first time once again...

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Lissa Wolsak

With the publication of this volume, Lissa Wolsak — who seemingly emerged as a fully-formed poet in the mid-1990s after various other pursuits — emerges for the first time once again. Her work is neither easily classified, nor traceable to a particular school or lineage, but instead continually creates its own unimpeachably evanescent context, independent of thought outside the work itself. “The mirror would do well to reflect further,” demands one of Jean Cocteau's Orphic “radio” voices. Wolsak's poetry more than satisfies this strange demand, for the self-reflective moment in her work takes us far beyond fashionable literary recursion, finding again and again a genuinely mysterious interpenetration of awareness, language, and human care. Squeezed Light includes all of Wolsak’s previously published poetry to date, her poetic essay “An Heuristic Prolusion,” an interview with the author, and an Introduction by George Quasha with Charles Stein.


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Studying Hunger Journals

Bernadette Mayer

June 2011

In 1972 Bernadette Mayer began this project as an aid to psychological counseling, writing in parallel journals so that, as she wrote in one (in bed, on subways, at parties, etc.), her psychiatrist read the other...

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Bernadette Mayer

June 2011

In 1972 Bernadette Mayer began this project as an aid to psychological counseling, writing in parallel journals so that, as she wrote in one (in bed, on subways, at parties, etc.), her psychiatrist read the other. Using colored pens to “color-code emotions,” she recorded dreams, events, memories, and reflections in a language at once free-ranging and precise—a work that creates its own poetics. She sought “a workable code, or shorthand, for the transcription of every event, every motion, every transition” of her own mind and to “perform this process of translation” on herself in the interest of evolving an innovative, inquiring language. Studying Hunger Journals registers this intention within a body of poetry John Ashbery has called “magnificent.”

Made public at last in its gorgeous various and unstinting entirety, Studying Hunger Journals reveals itself to be one of the great in fact epic works of a movement that could never be given a name. No label fit for such limitless activity, its terms being those of our restless language and its relentless go-betweens that move and may alter. Attend therefore and let them have their way, these words given without let and best received in kind.
—Clark Coolidge

We have been waiting a long time—decades, in fact—for the publication of Studying Hunger Journals, so this is an occasion to celebrate—that they have come into the world, into the light, and into our hands. Mayer’s experiment, her transcription of consciousness, is timeless and sexy. There is gentle genius in her heroic quest to be “an observer of self in process.”
—Brenda Coultas

Someone irritated me recently by saying “Our time lacks a poet’s poet. You know, a poet who gets you writing.” SHAME ON YOU I said. YOU ARE LIVING ON THE PLANET WHERE BERNADETTE MAYER LIVES AND WRITES! Are there bigger shoulders we stand on today? I don’t think so. Every time I’m in the same room as Bernadette I look around and think, “She is the best poet and smartest person
here!” My religion is Poetry and Bernadette Mayer is High Priestess!
—CAConrad


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Untam’d Wing

Jeffrey C. Robinson

The jazz term “riff” is short for “riffle”—“make rough.” In Untam’d Wing: Riffs on Romantic Poetry, scholar/poet Jeffrey Robinson sets out much like a jazz musician to renew a great body of work (say, Miles Davis on George Gershwin)—“to recast,” as he says in the Prefatory Note, “what have become monuments, with all the inertness of passive appreciation that monumentality encourages, into living forms”...

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Jeffrey C. Robinson

The jazz term “riff” is short for “riffle”—“make rough.” In Untam’d Wing: Riffs on Romantic Poetry, scholar/poet Jeffrey Robinson sets out much like a jazz musician to renew a great body of work (say, Miles Davis on George Gershwin)—“to recast,” as he says in the Prefatory Note, “what have become monuments, with all the inertness of passive appreciation that monumentality encourages, into living forms.” If he “roughs up” some of our long-time favorites, it’s not to revise, and certainly not to improve, but on the contrary to reveal a timeless dimension that is of the very nature of the Romantic: “I would define a ‘romantic’ poem, of whatever vintage, as one that invites its own renewal in every present.” With all the boldness and subtle care of the poets he celebrates, Robinson stakes his “life-long involvement as reader, teacher, and scholar/critic of Romantic poetry” on an equally committed “absorption and belief in the discoveries of modern and contemporary experimental poetry.” Like a true marriage it lays bare both parties.

"Untam’d Wing is a heady conglomeration of poetic intensities and re-visionings, of the Romantic mother lode. Only a poet deeply embedded in and enthralled by this realm could take wild liberties and shape them into a contemporary volume of such curious and inventive range. Jeffrey Robinson is a scholar and has lived inside the Romantic body for decades, and precisely because of this his imagination is highly attuned to further Romantic nuance…. He sheds bright light on meaning and message. He is the scientist/artist finally breaking free of shackles."
—Anne Waldman, from the foreword


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Vertical Elegies 6

Street Mete’s multimedia montage is a performative work in language/photo art. Truitt creates a poetics of transcribed voice recordings and on-the-spot photos made in the streets and subways of New York between 1996 and 2004....

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Sam Truitt

Street Mete’s multimedia montage is a performative work in language/photo art. Truitt creates a poetics of transcribed voice recordings and on-the-spot photos made in the streets and subways of New York between 1996 and 2004. Infused journal entries give autobiographical edge to its sometimes harsh historical landscape that includes the fall of civilizations, yoking for example the Mayan ruins of Chichén-Itzá to our current walkways. At core is spontaneous composition on the hoof, the “sudden diction” arising from a language artist meeting the world with recorder in hand, speaking forward—”a bit of rubble wearing clothes walking past madison square garden with a pair of enormous inflated boxing gloves oldenbergian in the car line catching fire...”


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