Station Hill Press publishes works of poetry, poetics, translation, and experimental prose. Founded in 1977, Station Hill is a project of the Institute for Publishing Arts, and our mission is to challenge and expand conceptions of human possibility. Located on the Hudson River in Barrytown, NY, we are open to the public by appointment.

New from Station Hill

A Fiery Flying Roule

Eirik Steinhoff

A Fiery Flying Roule: To all the Inhabitants of the Earth; Specially the Rich Ones reproduces a series of pamphlets handed out during the Oakland Commune (a.k.a. Occupy Oakland) from 2 November 2011, the day of the “general strike” that shut down the Port of Oakland, to May Day 2012....

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Eirik Steinhoff

A Fiery Flying Roule: to all the inhabitants of the earth; specially the rich ones reproduces a series of pamphlets distributed during the Oakland Commune (a.k.a. Occupy Oakland) from 2 November 2011, the day of the “general strike” that shut down the Port of Oakland, to May Day 2012. These 25 front-line transmissions are chronicle-collages of poetry, prose, photographs, and diagrams that reflect and respond to actions and events as they transpired in those heated 6 months. Their name recycles the title of a pair of antinomian pamphlets circulated by the London Ranter Abiezer Coppe in 1649; the tenor of Coppe’s prophetic do-it-yourself political barnstorming is continuously operative in these latter-day missives, particularly in the irregular orthography of the proper noun by which he called his pamphlets. This color-printed archive edition of the Roules includes a 60-pp. afterword that situates the project in its historical contexts.


$25.00List Price:

Awareness Inside Language

George Quasha in conversation with Thomas Fink

A Matrices Edition

Awareness Inside Language is the most comprehensive discussion of poet-artist George Quasha’s “axial poetics” as it plays out in his work of the past twenty years, called “preverbs" ...

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George Quasha in conversation with Thomas Fink

A Matrices Edition

Awareness Inside Language is the most comprehensive discussion of poet-artist George Quasha’s “axial poetics” as it plays out in his work of the past twenty years, called “preverbs,” represented in four published volumes: Verbal Paradise, Things Done for Themselves, The Daimon of the Moment, and Glossodelia Attract. In the form of an interview conducted by poet Thomas Fink, it addresses how apparently difficult poetry teaches new ways of reading and thinking.


$7.00List Price:

Crazy Louise (or la Conversazione Sacra)

Louise Landes Levi

Louise Landis Levi’s Crazy Louise (or la Conversazione Sacra) is a close view of sexual trauma, a reading and rewriting of the body, political and personal, in a series of poems. A deliberate departure―both from the formal construction of her previous works and from her focus on early (medieval) forms of feminine process and liberation (Sweet on My Lips, the Love Poems of Mira Bai), Levi here works close to home in a personal, often fragmented process....

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Louise Landes Levi

Louise Landis Levi’s Crazy Louise (or la Conversazione Sacra) is a close view of sexual trauma, a reading and rewriting of the body, political and personal, in a series of poems. A deliberate departure―both from the formal construction of her previous works and from her focus on early (medieval) forms of feminine process and liberation (Sweet on My Lips, the Love Poems of Mira Bai), Levi here works close to home in a personal, often fragmented process. She details and deconstructs conventions relating to maternal instinct, hierarchical lineage and the suffering of female perceptual process within patriarchal constructs unable to recognize it. Levi writes as an “initiate,” redeeming oriental schools of “crazy” (unconventional) wisdom, or open mind, from the debilitating, socially invasive use of this same term in the occidental world. This series of untitled poems comprises writings ca.1992-2002 and serves as an introduction to the poet’s work―indeed unveiling, as the cover portrait of the author by legendary photographer Ira Cohen suggests. As Levi writes, “Ira knew how to look―he could prophesy through the lens. He knew I would one day unveil myself. Dear Reader, you certainly cannot tell a book by its cover―if you could these pages would be written in gold.”


$16.95List Price:

Cubanology

Omar Perez
With an Afterword by the translator, Kristin Dykstra

In 2002, while temporarily living in Europe (mostly Amsterdam), the poet Omar Pérez began writing in a notebook. His journey began as a short professional visit that shifted into something less defined after he fell in love. Eventually the notebook became Cubanology, a book of days reflecting on three years of life at a remove from the island: “A memory of a flight, a journey, jour”...

Fall 2018

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Omar Perez
With an Afterword by the translator, Kristin Dykstra

In 2002, while temporarily living in Europe (mostly Amsterdam), the poet Omar Pérez began writing in a notebook. His journey began as a short professional visit that shifted into something less defined after he fell in love. Eventually the notebook became Cubanology, a book of days reflecting on three years of life at a remove from the island: “A memory of a flight, a journey, jour.” Along with registering common and uncommon vicissitudes of everyday life, the result presents a fusion of languages. Simultaneously national and polycultural, Cubanology streams poetic thought and experience, excerpts from other writings in progress, and the coalescence of a new islandic consciousness – scenes reminiscent of many-minded Odysseus, if home were heart. Visual material appearing throughout Cubanology blends Pérez’s sketches with photographs from that period, as well as art he made after returning to his family home on Havana’s iconic Malécon.

Fall 2018

ADVANCE PRAISE

"Welcoming as the guenmai soup whose making recurs throughout this journal, Cubanology carries the flavors of zen intensives, languages, and housecleaning; Greek retsina and Dutch beer; murmured conversations with books, friends, strangers, cultures, countries, and conditions. Omar Pérez is equally home-leaver and home-maker wherever he travels. Language is his pillow; zazen his backpack; music and imagination's freedoms his left and right shoes."

Jane Hirshfield

​"I'm quite taken by Cubanology, a book of the quotidian that rises to the universal. In morning we have zazen, in the afternoon we have language(s) and poetry, then later there is guenmai for 70 people (recipe included: carrots, onions, turnips, celery) but usually just for three or four or one. Are we in Amsterdam, or Athens, Munich? Yes. It is Cubanology, after all, and “He proposied realviciousization,/seated at the deskritorio” is the way poems are written when you are Omar Pérez. Part Pound, part Bolaño, add a Brechtian play, mix in some Hart Crane, spiced with Marianne Moore, Larry Eigner and Paul Hoover (Paul Hoover!), this is a global 24 hours that stretches time to eternity, consolidates place, and with a polyglot sensibility that seems bent on unifying all languages. Reading Cubanology is more like meditating than reading. Which is to say the ritual of the day. Which stays with you, and is tomorrow, the eternal day."

Bob Holman

"Omar Pérez's Cubanology is a Book of Days for the new century, a clear-eyed account of his travels in Europe, in the form of journal entries, essays, poems, translations, and meditations dating from 2002-2005. “To one seeking the truth,” he writes, “I offer only this: don't waste any time.” Hence he schools his readers in the art of making and measuring time according to the precepts of his Buddhist faith, the practice of which provides the scaffolding for this fascinating journey, which suggests that even if, as he writes, “travel intoxicates,” it also reveals the heart and soul of one of the most important artists of our time."

Christopher Merrill, author of Self-Portrait with Dogwood

 


$15.00List Price:

Dirty Work: A Chump’s Search for Meaning

Rod Bull

"What was happening? Everything I tried was going wrong. I needed to start again, get my life back. Would it be possible to change the events of my life, was there some basic flaw in me? 'There was a veiled past which I could not see, there was a door to which I had not key.' How would it be possible?" We've all been there: An impasse, a crossroads, an unmarked door—or some asymmetry in the weave of life that leaves us stuck at worst, though at best in question. So too begins Rod Bull’s ribald, funny, drunken, irreverent memoir of a seemingly accidental spiritual life....

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Rod Bull

"What was happening? Everything I tried was going wrong. I needed to start again, get my life back. Would it be possible to change the events of my life, was there some basic flaw in me? 'There was a veiled past which I could not see, there was a door to which I had not key.' How would it be possible?" We've all been there: An impasse, a crossroads, an unmarked door—or some asymmetry in the weave of life that leaves us stuck at worst, though at best in question. So too begins Rod Bull’s ribald, funny, drunken, irreverent memoir of a seemingly accidental spiritual life, with a constant refrain to “dirty work”—shoveling manure in a stable or bilge water in the belly of a ship, or cutting cane and viciously cut, the only cure to which is to urinate on yourself… Bull’s is a life of pratfalls, comic encounters (with an angry Jim Brown, the running back, in London, with sundry Tibetan Tulkus or with the tutelary heads of the Gurdjieff-Ouspensky Work) and hard won insights. What is of particular note is that here you read the story of no man soaring from height to golden height but an honest recounting and recollecting, blemishes and all, of a life of the spirit via serious hard traveling. Dirty Work: A Chump’s Search for Meaning is a memoir of crazy wisdom.


$7.00List Price:

Eating The Colors Of A Lineup Of Words: The Early Books of Bernadette Mayer

Bernadette Mayer
Edited by Michael Ruby & Sam Truitt

Bernadette Mayer is among the most influential poets of the late 20th century and to the present, with much of that interest falling to her earliest works. At the age of 15, in 1960, Mayer began writing and instantly with an incarnate directness and resource belying her youth. Over the next two decades, this precocious start would culminate in a body of writing extraordinary in its range and import. Even given that Mayer was moving in a New York milieu given to radical practice—as evidenced in the journal 0 to 9 she co-edited in the late '60s—these books in their collective force represent an explosion of poetic forms and investigation as profound and sustained as American poetry perhaps has seen....

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Bernadette Mayer
Edited by Michael Ruby & Sam Truitt
Bernadette Mayer is among the most influential poets of the late 20th century and to the present, with much of that interest falling to her earliest works. At the age of 15, in 1960, Mayer began writing and instantly with an incarnate directness and resource belying her youth. Over the next two decades, this precocious start would culminate in a body of writing extraordinary in its range and import. Even given that Mayer was moving in a New York milieu given to radical practice—as evidenced in the journal 0 to 9 she co-edited in the late '60s—these books in their collective force represent an explosion of poetic forms and investigation as profound and sustained as American poetry perhaps has seen. The permutations of her poetic shapes are myriad and through it all forms the irreverent and sacred, jocular and deadly serious, erotic, rigorously fashioned and off the cuff, gentle and tough, deadpan dance of a soul on fire—a poetic intelligence and skill operating at the heights. These early books have played an oceanic role in the formation of generations of experimental poets, though in shards, as many of the books on which her reputation is based have long been out of print—and so their operative life partial. This multi-volume publication, which includes some poems that have never been published—including such early long poems as “A Moving Boat Is a Squeezed Boat: 52 Cards” and “Complete Music of Webern (A Movie)”—makes available for the first time the near totality of Mayer’s early books.

Ceremony Latin (1964) * Red Book in Three Parts * Story * The Old Style Is Finding Out Something About A Whole New Set of Possibilities * Moving * Poetry * Eruditio Ex Memoria * The Golden Book of Words


$34.95List Price:

False Documents

Peter Lamborn Wilson

Are these texts shadows of the real? Or are they only false documents? “Incunablula” and “Ong’s Hat” first appeared in the 1980s and spawned a mini-industry of conspiracy lit, several scholarly books, even a kids’ TV series (“Gakidor”), and a rock band (“Ong’s Hat”). Here are the original “legendary” texts, along with various and sundry other alternative histories, bad translations and anarchist ephemera, plus several previously unpublished works, including an entire Sci-Fi novel: Lunar Mansion or, the Whole Rabbit (based on Cornelius Agrippa’s Occult Philosophy, which was used to generate the plot)....

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Peter Lamborn Wilson

Are these texts shadows of the real? Or are they only false documents? “Incunablula” and “Ong’s Hat” first appeared in the 1980s and spawned a mini-industry of conspiracy lit, several scholarly books, even a kids’ TV series (“Gakidor”), and a rock band (“Ong’s Hat”). Here are the original “legendary” texts, along with various and sundry other alternative histories, bad translations and anarchist ephemera, plus several previously unpublished works, including an entire Sci-Fi novel: Lunar Mansion or, the Whole Rabbit (based on Cornelius Agrippa’s Occult Philosophy, which was used to generate the plot).

A robust textual creativity resonates a region of magical transmutation, political possibility, and spiritual adventure, so that the whole collection vibrates and pulses with the flavors of the real. A “false” document would seem to involve a contradiction, since being false, it is no document at all. But documentation is no more possible than the articulation of some absolutely verifiable condition of Being itself. Peter Lamborn Wilson seems to have documented this condition with consummate probity.

—Charles Stein, author of There Where You Do Not Think to Be Thinking and transl. The Odyssey

Peter Lamborn Wilson is the very model of the outlaw scholar. Operating outside the stultifying atmosphere of academia, drawing on research and knowledge that is both wide and deep, and writing in clear and vivid prose blessedly free of jargon, Wilson charts the secret histories of this world and others.

—Rachel Pollack, writer, winner of the Arthur C. Clarke Award and the World Fantasy Award


$25.00List Price:

Glossodelia Attract

George Quasha

If William Blake’s “Proverbs of Hell” are poetry, then George Quasha’s preverbs are like a close cousin. Its core question is: can poetry say the unsayable? Preverbs wonder: what is poetry? A well established poetic tradition both modern and post-modern—some call it experimental—starts its poetics with: poetry is not what you think it is...

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George Quasha

If William Blake’s “Proverbs of Hell” are poetry, then George Quasha’s preverbs are like a close cousin. Its core question is: can poetry say the unsayable? Preverbs wonder: what is poetry? A well established poetic tradition both modern and post-modern—some call it experimental—starts its poetics with: poetry is not what you think it is. Its work is journeying inside language, as if passing through a distant country or else another reality. It conveys news of alternate dimensions showing through in the here-and-now, embedded inside our everyday thoughts and speaking.


$14.95List Price:

Heide Hatry: Icons in Ash

Heide Hatry

The art of the human image arose millennia ago as a way beyond impermanence and, especially, to keep the dead among us. The pictorial object "the icon" often carried a charge as ritual or ceremonial artifact and, indeed, as a thing with a certain power. The artist Heide Hatry has extended this tradition by creating realistic portraits made out of the actual ashes of the departed person portrayed....
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Heide Hatry
The art of the human image arose millennia ago as a way beyond impermanence and, especially, to keep the dead among us. The pictorial object "the icon" often carried a charge as ritual or ceremonial artifact and, indeed, as a thing with a certain power. The artist Heide Hatry has extended this tradition by creating realistic portraits made out of the actual ashes of the departed person portrayed. Are the results reminiscent of ancient sacred and secular traditions and their complex, even mysterious function to, say, calm, enrich or transform our experience? Icons in Ash includes seventeen of Hatry's portraits and twenty-seven contemporary writers who explore this phenomenon in original and engaging meditations on death, the dead body, art, relics, psychology, philosophy, religion, mourning, evolution, transformation, and immortality. Contributors include, among others, Hans Belting, Mark Dery, Eleanor Heartney, Siri Hustvedt, Jonas Mekas, Rick Moody, Mark Pachter, Steven Pinker, Wolf Singer, Luisa Valenzuela, and Peter Weibel.


$38.00List Price:

Hotel des Archives: A Trilogy

Chris Tysh

Hotel des Archives is a trilogy of books consisting of verse recastings from the French novels of Beckett, Genet and Duras. Synchronous with postmodernism's aesthetics of appropriation, détournement, sampling and other intertextual strategies, the project operates a double shift of genre and language, since she moves from the original French and from prose to lyric. These transcreations, as Tysh has been calling them, allow her to forsake the traditional mode of self-expression in favor of one that "translates" other cultural materials, creating an artistic network beyond boundaries and temporalities....

Fall 2018

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Chris Tysh

Hotel des Archives is a trilogy of books consisting of verse recastings from the French novels of Beckett, Genet and Duras. Synchronous with postmodernism's aesthetics of appropriation, détournement, sampling and other intertextual strategies, the project operates a double shift of genre and language, since she moves from the original French and from prose to lyric. These transcreations, as Tysh has been calling them, allow her to forsake the traditional mode of self-expression in favor of one that "translates" other cultural materials, creating an artistic network beyond boundaries and temporalities.

In Molloy, the Flip Side, she uses the French language in which Samuel Beckett wrote his novel Molloy to guide her into finding a contemporary American vernacular through which the hapless narrator speaks. Her three-line stanza formation compresses Beckett’s diegetic universe, sparse as it is, and allows her to link the two texts through the projection of a new, speaking subject — a funny, witty, old and disabled bum, going slowly nowhere.

In Our Lady of the Flowers, Echoic, Jean Genet's 1943 disturbing elegy for social heterogeneity, she attempts to find a poetic equivalent with which to evoke Divine, Mignon-Dainty-Feet, and the young assassin, Our Lady, three saintly figures in a forbidden realm of the senses. The seven-line stanzas of my Our Lady of the Flowers, Echoic are spacious enough to accommodate the narrative arc, while foregrounding their lyrical impact.

Her third transcreation flows from the novel The Ravishing of Lol V. Stein by Marguerite Duras, the celebrated author of the Hiroshima Mon Amour screenplay and winner of the Goncourt Prize for The Lover. In this type of relational poetics, she strives to maintain the narrative spaces and affects, while finding a new set of porous networks – lyrical trajectories that pass through various signposts of the text.

Fall 2018

ADVANCE PRAISE

Chris Tysh reads in, around, and through Molloy in this ingenious transformation of Beckett’s French prose into compulsively vernacular English tercets. The narrative echoes in Molloy: The Flip Side make for an unsettling familiarity, spiked with the verbal equivalent of dark chocolate and homemade rum.
Charles Bernstein

Like Genet, Tysh is something of a snake charmer—or the snake itself?—lyricism unfolding kaleidoscopically, extending emotions and meanings, fastening this mouse/reader to the spot.
Robert Glück

Chris Tysh’s gorgeous transcreation of Marguerite Duras’s haunted and haunting early novel draws out the lyricism of the text’s emotional algebra almost in the way one might draw poison from a wound. In Tysh’s condensed explorations of betrayal, voyeurism, and imitative desire, one finds a further textual ravishment—a lushly articulated response to Duras’s original that captures both the calculated and explosive qualities of its cry.
Elizabeth Willis


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House Crossing

Laurie Patton

House Crossing is a book of 32 poems about where we live or, more properly, dwell, with each poem entitled by a different attribute of domestic architecture as it is commonly known: Copula, eaves, attic, beams, etc. Such might lend itself to description, but in the vision of poet and scholar Laurie Patton each component becomes alive to an actuality beyond...

Spring 2018

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Laurie Patton

House Crossing is a book of 32 poems about where we live or, more properly, dwell, with each poem entitled by a different attribute of domestic architecture as it is commonly known: Copula, eaves, attic, beams, etc. Such might lend itself to description, but--reminiscent in part of Ronald Johnson's oeuvre (The Foundations, The Spires, and The Ramparts)--in the vision of poet and scholar Laurie Patton each component becomes alive to an actuality beyond physical construct: The poetics of how we hold our ground, even if it is in flux--or as she writes, "A river runs... below the house." The instigation for this poetic cycle is Gaston Bachelard's The Poetics of Space, with this collection a homage to that classic phenomenological analysis. As she writes in her introduction, House Crosing arose as "a straightforward observation about the endurance of Bachelard’s work: if a poetics is good enough, and I believe Bachelard’s is, then it does not only comment on poetry, but can give rise to poetry as well." What Patton gives rise to is in part an opportunity for us each to live more evocatively in our days and nights in each our own place, building a being, as "Noah’s ark stands / at the end of our hallway."

Spring 2018


$11.00List Price:

In the World Enormous

Tomer Inbar

In the World Enormous is engaged in transition, conversation and what transforms. Focused on a time beginning shortly before the death of Tomer Inbar’s mother and ending after the birth of his twin daughters, these poems constitute a speaking out of and about passing and starting....

 

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Tomer Inbar

In the World Enormous is engaged in transition, conversation and what transforms. Focused on a time beginning shortly before the death of Tomer Inbar’s mother and ending after the birth of his twin daughters, these poems constitute a speaking out of and about passing and starting, in plangent energy and restless balances finding words simultaneous to a human intimacy and intensity. In part informed by his study of early Japanese literature, Inbar is open to these poems being read with a loose internal movement and multi-directionality—though within a totality presence inscribes and fi nds in you. Inbar writes, “I fi nd comfort in being present as things move. With sibilance. On their own volition. Taking the qualities of their construction along.” These poems moreover seem to compel us to think an impossible thought.

ADVANCE PRAISE

Tomer Inbar’s meditative, complex work reminds the reader of Hopkins’s “inscapes” and “instresses”—profound encounters, fruits of intense moments of observation, and an enviable musical ear. I am particularly drawn to Inbar’s unusual, even innovative, usage of parentheses throughout this collection. On the one hand, it is what Olson meant by the poet’s ability to “record the listening he has done to his own speech and by that one act indicate how he would want any reader, silently or otherwise, to voice his work.” Moreover, Inbar uses parentheses to draw out the polyphony, worlds-within-worlds, commentary-upon-commentary, workings of the restless mind, as in, memorably: “Taking sticks to the mortuary: wild / Iris (bunches (of fresh tea (mint &) / marjoram (be discreet (she said) I / have neither their leisure nor / cadence) to arrive (in her state) momentarily.”
Jake Marmer

Like the poetry of A.R. Ammons, David Ignatow, George Oppen and Charles Reznikoff, Tomer Inbar’s poems attend to reality’s finest internal and external details. Artifacts of a nimble mind, these poems delight and enlighten. They have the capacity to stun the reader into a heightened state of wakefulness to become partners to the poet’s reality, living on the perpetual edge of witnessing abundance.
Jerry Mirskin

Tomer Inbar moves in careful relation to the enormous world, as if every word is a pearl of great price and the words exchanged between people are the greatest of all. These are poems that move between minds and reveal the deeper structures of thought and emotion that glide beneath the surface. Many of these poems are about human connection, and Inbar is an acute observer of the deeper ways that language opens fields of meaning between us … the beauty of a child’s mind, and all of the spaces that exist between thoughts, sounds, animals, museums, and the words we pass between each other.
Kristin Prevallet


$12.00List Price:

In|Filtration: An Anthology of Innovative Poetry from the Hudson River Valley

Anne Gorrick & Sam Truitt

In|Filtration is an anthology of contemporary Hudson Valley poetry that in one sense or another is innovative. The poets’ work is sometimes formally original and other times innovative in the use of more familiar poetic forms: old bottle/new wine; new bottle/old wine; and, quite often, new bottle/new wine. Much of the poetry here is directly or indirectly in conversation with national and international movements directed toward more exploratory uses of the medium...

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Anne Gorrick & Sam Truitt, Editors

In|Filtration is an anthology of contemporary Hudson Valley poetry that in one sense or another is innovative. The poets’ work is sometimes formally original and other times innovative in the use of more familiar poetic forms: old bottle/new wine; new bottle/old wine; and, quite often, new bottle/new wine. Much of the poetry here is directly or indirectly in conversation with national and international movements directed toward more exploratory uses of the medium—work that goes beyond the explorer's map into uncharted territories, places where the map tatters in the explorer's pocket and another world begins. Like explorers the editors have sought to map the contemporary currents of radical poetics in the Hudson Valley. There is truly an enormous wealth of poetic activity in the region, and of course such an exploration cannot be comprehensive Themselves poets, the editors present what they take to be the salient characteristic of the region in their essay “A Hudson Valley Salt Line” at the end of the anthology, pointing to the geological, human and cultural histories of the Hudson Valley as they dovetail with its poetries. They also provide their rationale for the title In|Filtration with particular reference to the Hudson River's salt line, which becomes the essay's key trope.


$34.95List Price:

Last Call: Awaken to Consciousness

James George

In his long life as naval historian, ambassador, environmentalist and author, James George has known a number of remarkable people and has lived in some of the world’s most interesting countries. The Dalai Lama calls him “my old friend.” Chogyam Trungpa called him “a wise and benevolent man, an ideal statesman.” He is credited with having helped to avert a war between India and Pakistan in 1971....

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James George

In his long life as naval historian, ambassador, environmentalist and author, James George has known a number of remarkable people and has lived in some of the world’s most interesting countries. The Dalai Lama calls him “my old friend.” Chogyam Trungpa called him “a wise and benevolent man, an ideal statesman.” He is credited with having helped to avert a war between India and Pakistan in 1971. Later, in the International Whaling Commission, he played a leading role in saving several species of whales from extinction. And now he shares what he can of his practice of the Gurdjieff way towards awakening to the present moment that has been the inner thread of his life for five decades—the awareness of the consciousness that is omnipresent and universal. However, most of this book is not about the Gurdjieff way but about what it means to be a real human being today, in the light of the latest science and of traditional teachings. He is the author of Asking for the Earth: Waking Up to the Spiritual/Ecological Crisis (1995), and The Little Green Book on Awakening (2008).


$18.95List Price:

Out of the Question: Selected Poems (1963-2003)

Lewis Warsh

Out of the Question: Selected Poems 1963-2003 gathers together a generous sample of work from Lewis Warsh’s many earlier collections. Warsh has been associated with the community of New York School writers who first met at The Poetry Project in Manhattan in the late 1960s, but as poet Forrest Gander writes, in a review of Warsh’s book Inseparable, “his influence has been felt nationally and internationally”....

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Lewis Warsh

Out of the Question: Selected Poems 1963-2003 gathers together a generous sample of work from Lewis Warsh’s many earlier collections. Warsh has been associated with the community of New York School writers who first met at The Poetry Project in Manhattan in the late 1960s, but as poet Forrest Gander writes, in a review of Warsh’s book Inseparable, “his influence has been felt nationally and internationally.” Out of the Question includes two long poems: The Suicide Rates, first published in 1967, and The Corset, which appeared in 1986. Novelist Paul Auster described The Corset as “not a poem so much as a new way of seeing the world. There is a stunning intelligence at work here, a fierce, deadpan wit that disturbs and enlightens in equal measure.” Auster’s comment can be applied to all of Warsh’s ongoing experiments, as both a poet and a fiction writer, and Out of the Question is the best possible introduction to anyone unfamiliar with his multi-layered body of work.


$19.00List Price:

Selected Poems: 1962-1986

Clark Coolidge
Edited by Clark Coolidge & Larry Fagin
Introduction by Bill Berkson

Clark Coolidge is a revered figure in the world of American and world experimental poetry, with much of such writing of the last 50 years seeming a footnote to or at best elaboration on his most radical reaches. Reading Coolidge's work is to "come back, this time enclosed, trim in paper. Plain sky part of sewn perimeters. Gurries and wobblances. The handtorch shows the tune its rock to turn." This Selected Poems will be how Coolidge's revolutionary early works will be read for generations to come....

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Clark Coolidge

Edited by Clark Coolidge & Larry Fagin

Introduction by Bill Berkson

Clark Coolidge is a revered figure in the world of American and world experimental poetry, with much of such writing of the last 50 years seeming a footnote to or at best elaboration on his most radical reaches. Reading Coolidge's work is to "come back, this time enclosed, trim in paper. Plain sky part of sewn perimeters. Gurries and wobblances. The handtorch shows the tune its rock to turn." This Selected Poems will be how Coolidge's revolutionary early works will be read for generations to come. Lyn Hejinian writes, "Reading through the still incredible work collected in this exemplary Selected Poems, I marvel all over again at the force of even the 'smallest' of Clark Coolidge’s poems. Coolidge’s sonic expertise has often been noted, and music—especially bebop and what has followed it—clearly has suggested to him ways to generate rhythmic clusters, to ride accelerations, to invent scales. No other poet ever has so exquisitely, and sometimes also turbulently, written sheer sonic wonder into poetry." This volume includes an introduction by Bill Berkson, entitled "The Spools of Clark Coolidge," recounting Coolidge's coming up and influences as well as eloquently expressing the visionary nature of his poetic enterprise.


$26.50List Price:

The Ballad of Sara and Thor

Andrew McCarron

On a September evening shortly before the millennium, a recent graduate of a small liberal arts college in upstate New York murdered his girlfriend in the parking lot of an Episcopal Church. Andrew McCarron, the author of The Ballad of Sara and Thor, was friendly with the couple, within earshot of the murder, and among the first to arrive on the scene....

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Andrew McCarron

On a September evening shortly before the millennium, a recent graduate of a small liberal arts college in upstate New York murdered his girlfriend in the parking lot of an Episcopal Church. Andrew McCarron, the author of The Ballad of Sara and Thor, was friendly with the couple, within earshot of the murder, and among the first to arrive on the scene. The assailant was eventually declared not guilty by reason of insanity and remanded into the custody of a New York mental health facility. After a few years, he was deemed rehabilitated and underwent the process of societal reintroduction. The Ballad of Sara and Thor is not only about this murder. The semi-fictionalized story draws on the genre of a murder ballad to detail the experiences of a young person undergoing the universal process of maturation and define what it is to be human. While few young adults bear witness to such a horrific event, most are faced with experiences that suddenly and starkly shatter the relatively simple existence of youth into the shades of grey that characterize a mature experience of the world. In publishing this novella, Station Hill Press aims to respect the author’s wishes that attention be brought not to the sensational aspects of a crime of passion. Rather, we wish to emphasize the book’s underlying and painfully beautiful arch of the coming of age of a consciousness passing from that of a young college student into an adult. The Ballad of Sara and Thor is at once a morality tale, murder ballad, and psychological true-detective exploration of the motivations and implications behind the violent death of a promising young person.


$12.95List Price:

The Syndicate of Water & Light

Marc Vincenz

In subtitling this book "A Divine Comedy," the poet Marc Vincenz brushes up against Dante, and yet he does so “in the pulse of a breath, /waiting for the rain / to wash away the dream.” There is light here—not perhaps the roseate of the Florentine retinue—but one we can use right now: “All visions / gone, but this, a world, / a world / dancing ahead..."

Fall 2018

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Marc Vincenz

In subtitling this book "A Divine Comedy," the poet Marc Vincenz brushes up against Dante, and yet he does so “in the pulse of a breath, /waiting for the rain / to wash away the dream.” There is light here—not perhaps the roseate of the Florentine retinue—but one we can use right now: “All visions / gone, but this, a world, / a world / dancing ahead.” Vincenz questions notions of humanity, the potency and power of language over time, implying perhaps that codes have driven us throughout history and that the emergence of the AI will yield the next stage in its evolution. After a long night of the soul, where formal religion yields to love and imagination, we emerge to a healing space that is both inner and outer, physical and spiritual. The Syndicate of Water & Light gives us a sense that we can grow in knowledge and that we can change—if not, perhaps, the world, then at least within ourselves.

Fall 2018


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The Weather in Normal

Carrie Etter

The fourth poetry collection by Carrie Etter focuses on her hometown of Normal, Illinois, in the American Midwest.  The Weather in Normal is not a set of straightforward memories but a slowly shifting entity, like a moving storm ....

Fall 2018

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Carrie Etter

Carrie Etter’s fourth poetry collection focuses on her hometown of Normal, Illinois, in the American Midwest. The Weather in Normal is not a set of straightforward memories but a slowly shifting entity, like a moving storm. The book opens with ‘Night Ode’, a poem set on a single street at night, the protagonist walking and feeling the oppressive summer heat, the humming of cicadas and the various ages she has walked the same road: “sixteen, nineteen, twenty-four, thirty-seven…”. This introduces us to the main themes of memory and recollection, of mature reflections on youthful experiences, of multiple, shifting perspectives.

The first of the book’s three arcs explores the family’s relationship to the weather and place, from the father’s obsession with the weather, to the brutal effects of the winters on the family, resulting in broken bones, the recognition of poverty, and the father’s paralysis. Yet the relationship to place also includes its appreciation. Etter offers us a vivid impression of the American prairie with its cornfields extending to the horizon. She muses on the various meanings of ‘Prairie’ and understands a landscape can haunt the imagination the way the past haunts the present.

The second arc explores the effect of the loss of the family home in the long poem ‘Afterlife.’ The house is a place of memory and of dream, an upbringing in a house crowded with sisters and then with her sisters’ children: “once three sat atop/ the upright piano/ playing the keys/ with their feet”. What is it to return, in imagination, to the house in which her father died? Can one ultimately relinquish one’s childhood home to its new owners?

The book’s final arc concerns the effects of climate change in Illinois, in part through the long poem, ‘Scar’, chronicling these effects—the greater occurrence of extreme weather, the loss of species, etc.--as well as human responsibility for them. Just as The Weather in Normal begin with music in ‘Night Ode’, so it ends with ‘And Now for a Kind of Song,’ a eulogistic poem relishing the poet’s relationship to Illinois.

Fall 2018

ADVANCE PRAISE

"Taking the temperature of memory, Etter's deeply moving fourth collection maps family and personal history against the iconography of the seasons and the planetary slide into climate disaster. Etter's richly inventive phrasing keeps this compelling range of concerns vividly opening up with immediacy, urgency, and sensitivity. Her connection of the global with the familial reminds us to "take it personally," while implicitly arguing for the intimacy of our relations with the world at every level."

Cole Swensen

Philip Gross: "One of the particular gifts of poetry is here in force: the power of a few words to create great spaces. The spaces of a prairie landscape round a small town or between present and past, between people in a family or between words on the page, these are not emptiness but tingling with resonance, with the poems' fine attention. Touched and unsettled, we slip seamlessly between the intimate detail of loss and the vast perspective in which even the prairies are dwarfed by the scale of climate change."

Philip Gross


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Twelve Drawings

Charles Stein

In 2015, Charles Stein started drawing in a particular way, the result of which, a few years on, is a continuum of hand-drawn works on paper. Though worked out with considerable deliberation regarding overall structure, the final images are emerging forms...

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Charles Stein

In 2015, Charles Stein started drawing in a particular way, the result of which, a few years on, is a continuum of hand-drawn works on paper. Though worked out with considerable deliberation regarding overall structure, the final images are emerging forms—arise in the concrete process of drawing itself—rather than the programmed achievements of that deliberation. The way they’re to be experienced, according to Stein, is similarly emergent, or as he says: “They are offered for extended perusal, for they will not yield their secrets on a single glance but, perhaps, solicit … retinal sensation, cortical processing, conceptual reflection, ineffable integration.”

Twelve Drawings is a fine, 10.75 x 15-inch, limited edition of 350 copies, of which 150 are unsigned ($75) and 200 are signed and numbered ($150). To buy this book, contact publishers@stationhill.org


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