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Dream Worlds of Pregnancy, The

Eileen Stukane

Pregnant women have intense and strange dreams, some ecstatic but many anxious and frightening. They almost always keep them secret, fearing that the dreams might mean that they are bad mothers-to-be, or that they might be somehow harmful to their unborn babies…

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Eileen Stukane

Pregnant women have intense and strange dreams, some ecstatic but many anxious and frightening. They almost always keep them secret, fearing that the dreams might mean that they are bad mothers-to-be, or that they might be somehow harmful to their unborn babies. The Dream Worlds of Pregnancy brings good news for all such women. Based on meticulous research into the dream journals of hundreds of normal, expectant parents, it demonstrates how common such dreams really are and how they can be used to help smooth the path to motherhood. It gives practical help in dream interpretation so parents-to-be can use dreams to gain insight into what they are experiencing and begin bonding with their baby.


$11.95List Price:

Eating The Colors Of A Lineup Of Words: The Early Books of Bernadette Mayer

Bernadette Mayer
Edited by Michael Ruby & Sam Truitt

Bernadette Mayer is among the most influential poets of the late 20th century and to the present, with much of that interest falling to her earliest works. At the age of 15, in 1960, Mayer began writing and instantly with an incarnate directness and resource belying her youth. Over the next two decades, this precocious start would culminate in a body of writing extraordinary in its range and import. Even given that Mayer was moving in a New York milieu given to radical practice—as evidenced in the journal 0 to 9 she co-edited in the late ’60s—these books in their collective force represent an explosion of poetic forms and investigation as profound and sustained as American poetry perhaps has seen….

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Bernadette Mayer
Edited by Michael Ruby & Sam Truitt
Bernadette Mayer is among the most influential poets of the late 20th century and to the present, with much of that interest falling to her earliest works. At the age of 15, in 1960, Mayer began writing and instantly with an incarnate directness and resource belying her youth. Over the next two decades, this precocious start would culminate in a body of writing extraordinary in its range and import. Even given that Mayer was moving in a New York milieu given to radical practice—as evidenced in the journal 0 to 9 she co-edited in the late ’60s—these books in their collective force represent an explosion of poetic forms and investigation as profound and sustained as American poetry perhaps has seen. The permutations of her poetic shapes are myriad and through it all forms the irreverent and sacred, jocular and deadly serious, erotic, rigorously fashioned and off the cuff, gentle and tough, deadpan dance of a soul on fire—a poetic intelligence and skill operating at the heights. These early books have played an oceanic role in the formation of generations of experimental poets, though in shards, as many of the books on which her reputation is based have long been out of print—and so their operative life partial. This multi-volume publication, which includes some poems that have never been published—including such early long poems as “A Moving Boat Is a Squeezed Boat: 52 Cards” and “Complete Music of Webern (A Movie)”—makes available for the first time the near totality of Mayer’s early books.

Ceremony Latin (1964) * Red Book in Three Parts * Story * The Old Style Is Finding Out Something About A Whole New Set of Possibilities * Moving * Poetry * Eruditio Ex Memoria * The Golden Book of Words


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Ec(o)logues

Peter Lamborn Wilson

Of Ec(o)logues, a Menippean Satyre (mixed poetry and prose, mixed serious and humorous) inspired by Virgil’s Eclogues, Charles Stein writes, “”It is my hope that this book will come as something of a revelation to the world of poetry: a revelation that poetry this good and good in this way can be produced in our times; good as rhythmically and sonorously exciting, expressive, intuitive, intelligent, well-measured, suitably barbaric, historically redolent, politically, metaphysically, even soteriologically astute…”

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Peter Lamborn Wilson

“It is my hope that this book by Peter Lamborn Wilson will come as something of a revelation to the world of poetry: a revelation that poetry this good and good in this way can be produced in our times; good as rhythmically and sonorously exciting, expressive, intuitive, intelligent, well-measured, suitably barbaric, historically redolent, politically, metaphysically, even soteriologically astute. A revelation because we are unaccustomed to poetry that is not predominately ironical in statement, excessively self-reflective in attitude, nor committed to the demolition of its own means, that is at once so extraordinarily urbane in spirit and down-home, downright funky in expressive spontaneity, not to mention intellectually complex, with a generous salting of wit and cognitive play. All this, too, without, through naiveté, ignorance, or obtuseness, exposing itself to critical missiles poised like ICBMs to be deployed against work that attempts just what these poems actually achieve.

And I would hazard a reason why: that the stance of the poetry—and Peter Lamborn Wilson has earned his stance through decades of committed prose—that the stance of this poetry, in the complexity of its reflection, the radical specificity of its attentions, and the intensity of its care—is in every breath a committed poetry, and committed in a singular, highly individuated, unpredictable way.
The verse may take its cue from Allen Ginsberg and William Blake, but its intellectual purview shows intimacy with Kropotkin, Proudhon, Engels, Swedenborg, Paracelsus, Agrippa, Erasmus Darwin, Pierre Clastres, Henry Corbin, Charles Fourier, and many others of an equally august if unconventionally referenced notoriety.

Wilson weaves a visionary poetics through an explicit politics, an explicit politics through an exuberant sense of imaginative freedom. Wilson names his political and spiritual agenda “neo-pastoralism” and mines the pastoral tradition of the venerable ancients—Theocritus, Virgil, Edmund Spencer—for material that reprises and expands themes from his previous pronunciamentos: Green Hermeticism, “Escape from the Nineteenth Century,” “The Shamanic Trace,” Pirate Utopias, Temporary Autonomous Zones, to name but a few of his titles.

The poetry is moderated by prose interludes in a variety of genres that develop thoughts in a manner appropriate to the energy of the poetry, not so much by providing conceptual bases for its contents (in a way it does that too), but by the sheer aptness of contiguity and multiplicitous resonance, worked out and placed with an intelligence whose lucidity is as disruptive as the rampant audacity of the verse.

A persistent organizing theme is the hypothesis (due to the late Pierre Clastres) that the historical arrival of “civilization” with its literacy, collectively organized agriculture, division of labor into rulers, administrators, and drones, its authoritarian religion, private property, and massive armies—in short, the advent of The State—came about through the failure of precise social formations that for tens of thousands of years had functioned to ward off and dissipate the agglomeration and centralization of political power. Modern humanity (since 4000 BCE) has invented its own ignorance of the deep human past—and called only what superceded and suppressed it—History. Wilson sets off in search of the traces of social practices now long eclipsed and finds them cannily in the most unlikely places.

The metaphysical posture is pantheism or “pagan monotheism,” aligned with anarchism. The work: to conjure an aggressive pantheism through a veil, haze, or prism of pastoral idealism—the lure of nature realized through the dangerous, bottom-feeding numinosity demonstrably intrinsic to it.

Orthodox (Abrahamic) monotheists routinely slander pantheism, averring that it entails, in practice, a slothful relaxation of the spirit and a general abnegation of conscience: if God is All, what need for moral discipline, intellectual rigor, or the restraint of native delinquency?

But if moral rigor as practiced until now proves to be the absolute repression of the divine in the world and the vassal of Statist discipline, even relaxation and license become tactics for the recovery of natural and divine values. It turns out, however, as any reader of Ec(o)logues may very well attest, that the attentions and affirmations demanded by pantheist-anarchism may prove anything but easily achieved. The affirmation of everything will test the stomach of any of us. It is the discipline and conscience of such an ontological perspective and the transgressive sacrality it entails, that there, where one cannot imagine the sacred, is precisely where one’s practice must seek it out. In that sense Ec(o)logues is itself spiritual praxis, for reader and poet alike.”

– Charles Stein


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EGZ Book of Frogs

Franz Kamin

EGZ Book of Frogs was originally written by “Uncle Franz” for the child (EGZ) that lives inside his adult friend Eve Rosenthal; and was illustrated by another friend, Kathy Bourbonais.  This and several other little stories were….

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Franz Kamin

EGZ Book of Frogs was originally written by “Uncle Franz” for the child (EGZ) that lives inside his adult friend Eve Rosenthal; and was illustrated by another friend, Kathy Bourbonais. This and several other little stories were later set to music for the mime and flute team of Jane Adler and Andrew Bolotowsky. The book is available either with or without a recording (7 inch LP) of these pieces. Also available from Station Hill Press: Franz Kamin’s book Ann Margret Loves You and 12 inch LP Behavioral Drift II/ Rugugmool.


$8.95List Price:

Emotional First Aid

RARE BOOK

The only “how-to” book on emotional crises as distinct from long-term emotional problems, Emotional First Aid shows how to handle intense emotional episodes…

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Sean Haldane

The only “how-to” book on emotional crises as distinct from long-term emotional problems, Emotional First Aid shows how to handle intense emotional episodes as well as crises between parents and children. Haldane argues that these crises must be dealt with on an individual basis if one is not to be invasive in coming to another’s aid, and that emotional first aid can help avoid the necessity for psychotherapy just as physical first aid can prevent extended medical treatment.


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Empathy

Mei Mei Berssenbrugge

What can one person know of another? These poems act as energy fields of images from science, philosophy, and romantic love. They evoke the spaces of the New Mexican desert, the Alaskan tundra, her Chinese home, and the interior self in relationships, as the poet makes empathy…

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Mei Mei Berssenbrugge

What can one person know of another? These poems act as energy fields of images from science, philosophy, and romantic love. They evoke the spaces of the New Mexican desert, the Alaskan tundra, her Chinese home, and the interior self in relationships, as the poet makes empathy a metaphor for the space of one person inside another. The lines of verse are long, sensuous, and prose-like, following the open horizons of the West.

“Mei-mei Berssenbrugge’s poetry moves from “inner” phenomena to ones coming from the “external” world and back again with breathtaking evenness. Calmly and convincingly she leads our attention from…. confidence or passion or attention itself to ice crystals, gulls fireworks, or apple trees and to very specific qualities of perception, especially vision- most notably, those associated with the properties of light- fogginess, brightness, colors- (what a poet of light she is!)- in poetry that always speaks equally about “the world” and “herself.” She is neither “objectivist” nor “subjectivist” but a poet of the whole consciousness. A virtuoso of the long line, hers- unlike those of most other poets- are startlingly non-rhapsodic, although they are more truly emotional than those of most rhapsodists. I’ve known and loved Mei-mei Berssenbrugge’s poetry for years. It gets better all the time.” -Jackson Mac Low


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Extended Frames

This is the first book of an extraordinary young photographer whose extension of the frame gives the image its play in time and returns it to its connection with Event.

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This is the first book of an extraordinary young photographer whose extension of the frame gives the image its play in time and returns it to its connection with Event. Taking as object the experimental performances of Co-Accident, a Baltimore-based group of poets, musicians, and “theatricians” that is having its own impact on international performance art, Sue Abramson allows the photographic image to register the disciplined free behavior of people moving in light. The result is an amplification of those photographic possibilities opened up and given mastery by the late Barbara Blondeau, and shows that when the fixed image travels beyond the fixed frame it can become both abstract and cinematic. Person is objectified by multiplicity, and object is personified in the specific character of its movement. Eye and mind grow larger together as they interact at the point where hand controls lens. — George Quasha


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Fabrications

Gisela Gamper and Rachel Pollack

Fabrications is a series of photographs composed by Gisela Gamper accompanied by text of Rachel Pollock. In the opening, Pollock states, “Like many women artists, Gamper uses her body as a (literal) ground of being, the necessary source from which all experience must emerge…

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Gisela Gamper and
Rachel Pollack

Fabrications is a series of photographs composed by Gisela Gamper accompanied by text of Rachel Pollock. In the opening, Pollock states, “Like many women artists, Gamper uses her body as a (literal) ground of being, the necessary source from which all experience must emerge. But she also absorbs experience back into her own form. Instead of exploring how the body inhabits and moves in an alien world, these photos graft the world itself directly onto the artist’s torso, at first through photomontage, and later through computer manipulation of images.”

Pollock continues, “Though the pictures veer toward abstraction they all begin in the artist’s life.”

The book ends with a quote from Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche which points to a message this collection deeply invokes—“The essence of mind is in the heart.”


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Facing the Music

“Magnificent poetry; dark, severe, even harsh — yet pulsating with life.” -John Ashbery

“A poem has to be heard before it is written. Paul Auster hears with his marvelous exactness the tone and modulations of that voice.” -William Bronk

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False Documents

Peter Lamborn Wilson

Are these texts shadows of the real? Or are they only false documents? “Incunablula” and “Ong’s Hat” first appeared in the 1980s and spawned a mini-industry of conspiracy lit, several scholarly books, even a kids’ TV series (“Gakidor”), and a rock band (“Ong’s Hat”). Here are the original “legendary” texts, along with various and sundry other alternative histories, bad translations and anarchist ephemera, plus several previously unpublished works, including an entire Sci-Fi novel: Lunar Mansion or, the Whole Rabbit (based on Cornelius Agrippa’s Occult Philosophy, which was used to generate the plot)….

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Peter Lamborn Wilson

Are these texts shadows of the real? Or are they only false documents? “Incunablula” and “Ong’s Hat” first appeared in the 1980s and spawned a mini-industry of conspiracy lit, several scholarly books, even a kids’ TV series (“Gakidor”), and a rock band (“Ong’s Hat”). Here are the original “legendary” texts, along with various and sundry other alternative histories, bad translations and anarchist ephemera, plus several previously unpublished works, including an entire Sci-Fi novel: Lunar Mansion or, the Whole Rabbit (based on Cornelius Agrippa’s Occult Philosophy, which was used to generate the plot).

A robust textual creativity resonates a region of magical transmutation, political possibility, and spiritual adventure, so that the whole collection vibrates and pulses with the flavors of the real. A “false” document would seem to involve a contradiction, since being false, it is no document at all. But documentation is no more possible than the articulation of some absolutely verifiable condition of Being itself. Peter Lamborn Wilson seems to have documented this condition with consummate probity.

—Charles Stein, author of There Where You Do Not Think to Be Thinking and transl. The Odyssey

Peter Lamborn Wilson is the very model of the outlaw scholar. Operating outside the stultifying atmosphere of academia, drawing on research and knowledge that is both wide and deep, and writing in clear and vivid prose blessedly free of jargon, Wilson charts the secret histories of this world and others.

—Rachel Pollack, writer, winner of the Arthur C. Clarke Award and the World Fantasy Award


$25.00List Price:

Faust Foutu

Robert Duncan

Faust Foutu (Faust Screwed) is a satire featuring a mid-20th-century Faust as a bourgeois artist “suffering” for his art. It was first performed by poets and painters in San Francisco in 1955. The book includes drawings by the poet made to accompany the printed text.

“In the early fifties…

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Robert Duncan

Faust Foutu (Faust Screwed) is a satire featuring a mid-20th-century Faust as a bourgeois artist “suffering” for his art. It was first performed by poets and painters in San Francisco in 1955. The book includes drawings by the poet made to accompany the printed text.

“In the early fifties the art of painting was at the cutting edge (Clyfford Still, Pollock, Rothko) — it’s not surprising that this “screwed” Faust is a painter or that a public reading and performance of the piece should have taken place at San Francisco’s most intensely avant garde art gallery, the Six Gallery. It’s no surprise either that the actors in the presentation, seated at a long table on a little dais, should be friends, actors, experimental film-makers, poets, painters, and playwrights. Poet Jack Spicer leaned towards the audience at moments with intensity and almost boyish innocence of expression and near harshness of diction. Larry Jordan, the film-maker, had been encouraged by Duncan to just sing loudly and naturally letting his untrained voice carry Faust’s songs. Painter, and life-friend of Duncan’s, Jess Collins, spoke his lines with immense clarity and irony. The play was being tested on the ear, there was no acting-out as Duncan did in his solo performances, this was to be heard—and, listen, it’s still sounding.” -Michael McClure

Robert Duncan’s “comic masque” Faust Foutu was first performed in 1955 and published in a small edition in 1960 with drawings by the poet, reproduced here in a trade edition.


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Finding the Lamb

In her third book of poems and prose, Rebecca Newth writes with a compelling commitment to the clear perception of her experience as a poet, mother and child.


Flowers of Unceasing Coincidence, The

Returning from India in 1983, haunted by geometric relationships between economies and persons, by images of new ways of being alive that he had seen, Robert Kelly began this long poem…

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Returning from India in 1983, haunted by geometric relationships between economies and persons, by images of new ways of being alive that he had seen, Robert Kelly began this long poem. The Persian Gulf, the oil wars we inhabit, transgression and invasion, are motives as the text tries to escape the false comforts of continuity and reach the space that opens between words.


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Forbidden Vision

Nina Bouraoui grew up in a liberal university milieu, completely unlike the one she describes in Forbidden Vision

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Nina Bouraoui grew up in a liberal university milieu, completely unlike the one she describes in Forbidden Vision. Because of the strength of her memories, both good and bad, of her years spent in Algeria, and her own Algerian roots, she wanted her first novel to be about that country. Eager to portray Algerian society and character as she describes them — “boiling,” “dangerous,” “exciting”



Form of Taking It All, A

Rosmarie Waldrop

Just as the discovery of America in the fifteenth century forever altered the way Europeans viewed the world, so too did the theories of relativity and quantum physics radically alter the twentieth-century vision of the universe.

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Rosmarie Waldrop

Just as the discovery of America in the fifteenth century forever altered the way Europeans viewed the world, so too did the theories of relativity and quantum physics radically alter the twentieth-century vision of the universe. Both encounters with otherness, on both a global and personal level, form the crux of Rosmarie Waldrop’s extraordinary novel. The story roams the political worlds of old Mexico and Washington, D.C., and goes on to fuse the two great perceptual revolutions of the fifteenth and twentieth centuries—so that it is Columbus, in her fiction, who discovers the unpredicted particles of the new quantum physics. Waldrop’s brilliant narrative shifts from stream of consciousness to first-person narration to poetry, in a unique meditation on love and politics, conquest and tolerance, and the effects of change.


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From the Desert to the Book

Edmond Jabes Pierre Joris (trans.)

The fate of the individual among disintegrating tradition is a major theme of Edmund Jabes. In this book of literary and philosophical conversations, France’s leading Jewish writer adds an intimate, personal dimension to his formidable 40-year career.

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Edmond Jabes,
Pierre Joris (trans.)

The fate of the individual among disintegrating tradition is a major theme of Edmund Jabes. In this book of literary and philosophical conversations, France’s leading Jewish writer adds an intimate, personal dimension to his formidable 40-year career. Compelling in its inquiry into the fate of reading and writing in our time, it is also profoundly ambiguous, open to a multiplicity of possible readings. This work offers insight of a new kind into this major writer’s growing canon in English—thoughts on his own works combine with stories of his youth in Egypt, his exile in 1956, other writers and artists, the Kabbalah, and projections for a postmodern world.


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From Trinity to Trinity

Kyoko Hayashi and Eiko Otake, Translator

From Trinity to Trinity recounts the pilgrimage of Japanese atomic-bomb survivor Kyoko Hayashi to the Trinity Site in northern New Mexico, where the world’s first atomic bomb test was conducted…

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Kyoko Hayashi and Eiko Otake, Translator

FROM TRINITY TO TRINITY recounts the pilgrimage of Japanese atomic-bomb survivor Kyoko Hayashi to the Trinity Site in northern New Mexico, where the world’s first atomic bomb test was conducted. Her journey takes her into unfamiliar terrain, both past and present, as she not only confronts American attitudes, disconcertingly detached from the suffering of nuclear destruction, but discovers as well a profound kinship with desert plants and animals, the bomb’s “first victims.” Translator Eiko Otake, a renowned artist in dance (Eiko & Koma), offers further insight into Hayashi’s life and work, illuminating how her identity as “outsider” helped shape her vision. Together author and translator present one woman’s transformation from victim to witness, a portrait of endurance as a power of “being” against all odds.


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Gary Hill: HanD HearD/Liminal Objects

George Quasha and Charles Stein

This essay, discussing a two-part installation at Galerie des Archives in Paris by the internationally celebrated artist, Gary Hill, explores the enigmatic nature of the work of art as an object and of objects in general, as such issues pertain to Hill’s work and these installations in particular.

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George Quasha and Charles Stein

This essay, discussing a two-part installation at Galerie des Archives in Paris by the internationally celebrated artist, Gary Hill, explores the enigmatic nature of the work of art as an object and of objects in general, as such issues pertain to Hill’s work and these installations in particular. The text is by two well-known poet/artists who have a long history of association and collaboration with Gary Hill. This book is handsomely illustrated with photographs of the installation and other relevant works by Hill and is presented in a bilingual, French-English edition.

Excerpts from the text:

“There are works of art that require initiation. This does not mean that they require explanation, special consensus, or any other prescriptive bearing. It does mean that one must discover an _appropriate mode of entry_ which is more than informational. This can involve radical reorientation, as in the case of _HanD HearD_, which directly (but non-coercively) introduces us to the posture of awareness appropriate to our participation in the piece.”

“Considering more particularly the piece _HanD HearD_, we discover that its way of being a text imposes nothing on the mind, yet it offers an _image_ (a hand in front of a person’s face) as a possible _posture_ of awareness. And because the “text” has no “content” other than this posture, it grants the participant _direct access_ from the beginning.”


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Gaze of Orpheus, The

“When we come to write the history of criticism for the 1940 to 1980 period, it will be found that Blanchot, together with Sartre, made French’discourse’ possible…”

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Maurice Blanchot and Lydia Davis, trans.

“When we come to write the history of criticism for the 1940 to 1980 period, it will be found that Blanchot, together with Sartre, made French “discourse” possible, both in its relentlessness and its acuity….This selection…is exemplary for its clearly translated and well-chosen excerpts from Blanchot’s many influential books. Reading him now, and in this form, I feel once more the excitement of discovering Blanchot in the 1950s…”-Geoffrey Hartman


$17.95List Price:

Gently Whispered

This compilation of teachings presents the oral wisdom of Kalu Rinpoche, revered worldwide as a teacher of Vajrayana Buddhism. Here are his views on the mastery on the three yanas, the vows of Refuge and Bodhisattva …

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This compilation of teachings presents the oral wisdom of Kalu Rinpoche, revered worldwide as a teacher of Vajrayana Buddhism. Here are his views on the mastery on the three yanas, the vows of Refuge and Bodhisattva, and the true nature of the mind. Also included are techniques for stepping beyond the Four Veils of Obscuration and Emotional Subjectivity onto the Five Paths that culminate in the liberation of mahamudra, plus a thorough introduction to the visualization techniques of yidam practice, a detailed commentary on the Chenrezig sadhana, and an extensive explanation of the Bardos of Death and Dying. Leavened with humor and fresh insight, this first English translation is an excellent resource for the novice and experienced student alike.


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Giving the Lily Back Her Hands

This text is a psychotypographic romance caught listening to the voices inside the voice from which it issues. It mates willingly with its Reader, releases quickness & lightness in the marriage of syntax, then returns to…

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This text is a psychotypographic romance caught listening to the voices inside the voice from which it issues. It mates willingly with its Reader, releases quickness & lightness in the marriage of syntax, then returns to the underground where Lily & Hands receive their power to discourse.



Glossodelia Attract

George Quasha

If William Blake’s “Proverbs of Hell” are poetry, then George Quasha’s preverbs are like a close cousin. Its core question is: can poetry say the unsayable? Preverbs wonder: what is poetry? A well established poetic tradition both modern and post-modern—some call it experimental—starts its poetics with: poetry is not what you think it is

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George Quasha

If William Blake’s “Proverbs of Hell” are poetry, then George Quasha’s preverbs are like a close cousin. Its core question is: can poetry say the unsayable? Preverbs wonder: what is poetry? A well established poetic tradition both modern and post-modern—some call it experimental—starts its poetics with: poetry is not what you think it is. Its work is journeying inside language, as if passing through a distant country or else another reality. It conveys news of alternate dimensions showing through in the here-and-now, embedded inside our everyday thoughts and speaking.


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Good Grief Rituals

In this comforting and deeply thoughtful book, the author offers a series of simple grief rituals, among them the venting of feelings, letter writing, affirmations, exercises to act out negative emotions as well as forgiveness…

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In this comforting and deeply thoughtful book, the author offers a series of simple grief rituals, among them the venting of feelings, letter writing, affirmations, exercises to act out negative emotions as well as forgiveness, fantasies, meditations, and more. Adult children of alcoholics, victims of incest and assault, and those who have ended a relationship, lived through a natural disaster, wrecked a car, or suffered any kind of loss, will find that these rituals move them beyond loss to forgiveness, gratitude and a new sense of life.


$13.95List Price:

Great Dime Store Centennial, The

Don Byrd

This book is a guide book to the Seven Wonders of the ancient world, seven long solos in a jam session with the dead, an answer to the four great philosophic questions of Immanuel Kant, the song of a barbaric horde, an eavesdropping at the borders of contemporary history, an account of an apocalyptic disco….

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Don Byrd

This book is a guide book to the Seven Wonders of the ancient world, seven long solos in a jam session with the dead, an answer to the four great philosophic questions of Immanuel Kant, the song of a barbaric horde, an eavesdropping at the borders of contemporary history, an account of an apocalyptic disco….And the presiding beings are Beethoven, Napoleon, Sousa, Frank Woolworth, Buddy Bolden, Charlie Parker, and Ludwig Wittgenstein. You are invited to participate. R.S.V.P.

“This powerful act of language is at once a celebration and a moan of dismay. Its theme is the advent of the “Information Society,” and its roots are in both the Western Intellectual traditions and American forms of life. The poem’s seven sections are devoted repsectively to the Seven Wonders of the ancient world, marking the strange persistence of ancient categories of the enigmatic and awesome in the contemporary world.

The accident of the centenary of the founding of the F.W. Woolworth chain provides both the poem’s formal occasion and a “principle” for organizing its detail—a delirious proliferation of artifacts – useful and absurd – arbitrary, fanciful and pragmatic in their arrangement.” – Charles Stein


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Great Expectations

Kathy Acker

Great Expectations begins when a young boy, Pip, learns he has come into great expectations. What these expectations actually are, or the change from the total disparity between Pip’s ideas of ‘expectations’ and what is real to Pip’s learning to feel, is the narrative of this plagiarized Bildungsroman…

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Kathy Acker

This book begins when a young boy, Pip, learns he has come into great expectations. What these expectations actually are, or the change from the total disparity between Pip’s ideas of ‘expectations’ and what is real to Pip’s learning to feel, is the narrative of this plagiarized Bildungsroman.

Thus Great Expectations is both the story of a young boy’s introduction to the world and a profound examination of moral values. Written at a time when Acker’s relationship with society is in question, texts given by the society—Dickens, Proust, Flaubert, Reage, Victoria Holt, Keats—appear both as they were written and in a new and interrogative light. The whole culture is brought into question.

Out of the agony of the author’s total disenchantment, or plagiarism, appears beauty: given text is laid on given text; language is no longer used to control but to be; the reader touches language rather than is controlled by it; meaning changes to tapestry. This book is totally sensuous.

This book is “the most completely unified work of art Acker has yet produced. One that by its formal concentration and its unified shape at every depth of reading fulfills the sort of demands that Sterne or Canetti makes of the novelist.” – Alain Robbe-Grillet