Poetry

Dialectic of Vision, The

Fred Dortort

This meticulous, close reading of the entire of William Blake’s great prophetic poem, “Jerusalem,” challenges almost every extant critical assumption about this poem, from the function of the figures Los and Entitharmon to the belief that….

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Fred Dortort

This meticulous, close reading of the entire of William Blake’s great prophetic poem, “Jerusalem,” challenges almost every extant critical assumption about this poem, from the function of the figures Los and Entitharmon to the belief that in Jerusalem Blake is finally reconciled with Christianity. In the face of decades of continuing efforts to domesticate and normalize Blake’s poetry, The Dialectic of Vision seeks to reaffirm, in the strongest possible terms — its spirit, as well as its uniquely organized coherence and astonishing relevance for our time.


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Disorders of the Real

Alan Sondheim

This collection of writing represents, in Sondheim’s words, “a basic text for postmodern poets.”

Sondheim states, “My approach would describe something like….”

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Alan Sondheim

This collection of writing represents, in Sondheim’s words, “a basic text for postmodern poets.”

Sondheim states, “My approach would describe something like the impossible search for the grounds of the Self in sexuality and ideology; the hysteria of the loss of speech; a work situated between poetry and theory that extends the boundaries of theory itself; ‘the poetry of deconstruction’; ‘the narrative of loss’ …”

STOCK IS LOW BUT EXISTENT… CONTACT US DIRECTLY OR…


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Distance Function


Eating The Colors Of A Lineup Of Words: The Early Books of Bernadette Mayer

Bernadette Mayer
Edited by Michael Ruby & Sam Truitt

Bernadette Mayer is among the most influential poets of the late 20th century and to the present, with much of that interest falling to her earliest works. At the age of 15, in 1960, Mayer began writing and instantly with an incarnate directness and resource belying her youth. Over the next two decades, this precocious start would culminate in a body of writing extraordinary in its range and import. Even given that Mayer was moving in a New York milieu given to radical practice—as evidenced in the journal 0 to 9 she co-edited in the late ’60s—these books in their collective force represent an explosion of poetic forms and investigation as profound and sustained as American poetry perhaps has seen….

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Bernadette Mayer
Edited by Michael Ruby & Sam Truitt
Bernadette Mayer is among the most influential poets of the late 20th century and to the present, with much of that interest falling to her earliest works. At the age of 15, in 1960, Mayer began writing and instantly with an incarnate directness and resource belying her youth. Over the next two decades, this precocious start would culminate in a body of writing extraordinary in its range and import. Even given that Mayer was moving in a New York milieu given to radical practice—as evidenced in the journal 0 to 9 she co-edited in the late ’60s—these books in their collective force represent an explosion of poetic forms and investigation as profound and sustained as American poetry perhaps has seen. The permutations of her poetic shapes are myriad and through it all forms the irreverent and sacred, jocular and deadly serious, erotic, rigorously fashioned and off the cuff, gentle and tough, deadpan dance of a soul on fire—a poetic intelligence and skill operating at the heights. These early books have played an oceanic role in the formation of generations of experimental poets, though in shards, as many of the books on which her reputation is based have long been out of print—and so their operative life partial. This multi-volume publication, which includes some poems that have never been published—including such early long poems as “A Moving Boat Is a Squeezed Boat: 52 Cards” and “Complete Music of Webern (A Movie)”—makes available for the first time the near totality of Mayer’s early books.

Ceremony Latin (1964) * Red Book in Three Parts * Story * The Old Style Is Finding Out Something About A Whole New Set of Possibilities * Moving * Poetry * Eruditio Ex Memoria * The Golden Book of Words


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Ec(o)logues

Peter Lamborn Wilson

Of Ec(o)logues, a Menippean Satyre (mixed poetry and prose, mixed serious and humorous) inspired by Virgil’s Eclogues, Charles Stein writes, “”It is my hope that this book will come as something of a revelation to the world of poetry: a revelation that poetry this good and good in this way can be produced in our times; good as rhythmically and sonorously exciting, expressive, intuitive, intelligent, well-measured, suitably barbaric, historically redolent, politically, metaphysically, even soteriologically astute…”

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Peter Lamborn Wilson

“It is my hope that this book by Peter Lamborn Wilson will come as something of a revelation to the world of poetry: a revelation that poetry this good and good in this way can be produced in our times; good as rhythmically and sonorously exciting, expressive, intuitive, intelligent, well-measured, suitably barbaric, historically redolent, politically, metaphysically, even soteriologically astute. A revelation because we are unaccustomed to poetry that is not predominately ironical in statement, excessively self-reflective in attitude, nor committed to the demolition of its own means, that is at once so extraordinarily urbane in spirit and down-home, downright funky in expressive spontaneity, not to mention intellectually complex, with a generous salting of wit and cognitive play. All this, too, without, through naiveté, ignorance, or obtuseness, exposing itself to critical missiles poised like ICBMs to be deployed against work that attempts just what these poems actually achieve.

And I would hazard a reason why: that the stance of the poetry—and Peter Lamborn Wilson has earned his stance through decades of committed prose—that the stance of this poetry, in the complexity of its reflection, the radical specificity of its attentions, and the intensity of its care—is in every breath a committed poetry, and committed in a singular, highly individuated, unpredictable way.
The verse may take its cue from Allen Ginsberg and William Blake, but its intellectual purview shows intimacy with Kropotkin, Proudhon, Engels, Swedenborg, Paracelsus, Agrippa, Erasmus Darwin, Pierre Clastres, Henry Corbin, Charles Fourier, and many others of an equally august if unconventionally referenced notoriety.

Wilson weaves a visionary poetics through an explicit politics, an explicit politics through an exuberant sense of imaginative freedom. Wilson names his political and spiritual agenda “neo-pastoralism” and mines the pastoral tradition of the venerable ancients—Theocritus, Virgil, Edmund Spencer—for material that reprises and expands themes from his previous pronunciamentos: Green Hermeticism, “Escape from the Nineteenth Century,” “The Shamanic Trace,” Pirate Utopias, Temporary Autonomous Zones, to name but a few of his titles.

The poetry is moderated by prose interludes in a variety of genres that develop thoughts in a manner appropriate to the energy of the poetry, not so much by providing conceptual bases for its contents (in a way it does that too), but by the sheer aptness of contiguity and multiplicitous resonance, worked out and placed with an intelligence whose lucidity is as disruptive as the rampant audacity of the verse.

A persistent organizing theme is the hypothesis (due to the late Pierre Clastres) that the historical arrival of “civilization” with its literacy, collectively organized agriculture, division of labor into rulers, administrators, and drones, its authoritarian religion, private property, and massive armies—in short, the advent of The State—came about through the failure of precise social formations that for tens of thousands of years had functioned to ward off and dissipate the agglomeration and centralization of political power. Modern humanity (since 4000 BCE) has invented its own ignorance of the deep human past—and called only what superceded and suppressed it—History. Wilson sets off in search of the traces of social practices now long eclipsed and finds them cannily in the most unlikely places.

The metaphysical posture is pantheism or “pagan monotheism,” aligned with anarchism. The work: to conjure an aggressive pantheism through a veil, haze, or prism of pastoral idealism—the lure of nature realized through the dangerous, bottom-feeding numinosity demonstrably intrinsic to it.

Orthodox (Abrahamic) monotheists routinely slander pantheism, averring that it entails, in practice, a slothful relaxation of the spirit and a general abnegation of conscience: if God is All, what need for moral discipline, intellectual rigor, or the restraint of native delinquency?

But if moral rigor as practiced until now proves to be the absolute repression of the divine in the world and the vassal of Statist discipline, even relaxation and license become tactics for the recovery of natural and divine values. It turns out, however, as any reader of Ec(o)logues may very well attest, that the attentions and affirmations demanded by pantheist-anarchism may prove anything but easily achieved. The affirmation of everything will test the stomach of any of us. It is the discipline and conscience of such an ontological perspective and the transgressive sacrality it entails, that there, where one cannot imagine the sacred, is precisely where one’s practice must seek it out. In that sense Ec(o)logues is itself spiritual praxis, for reader and poet alike.”

– Charles Stein


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EGZ Book of Frogs

Franz Kamin

EGZ Book of Frogs was originally written by “Uncle Franz” for the child (EGZ) that lives inside his adult friend Eve Rosenthal; and was illustrated by another friend, Kathy Bourbonais.  This and several other little stories were….

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Franz Kamin

EGZ Book of Frogs was originally written by “Uncle Franz” for the child (EGZ) that lives inside his adult friend Eve Rosenthal; and was illustrated by another friend, Kathy Bourbonais. This and several other little stories were later set to music for the mime and flute team of Jane Adler and Andrew Bolotowsky. The book is available either with or without a recording (7 inch LP) of these pieces. Also available from Station Hill Press: Franz Kamin’s book Ann Margret Loves You and 12 inch LP Behavioral Drift II/ Rugugmool.


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Empathy

Mei Mei Berssenbrugge

What can one person know of another? These poems act as energy fields of images from science, philosophy, and romantic love. They evoke the spaces of the New Mexican desert, the Alaskan tundra, her Chinese home, and the interior self in relationships, as the poet makes empathy…

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Mei Mei Berssenbrugge

What can one person know of another? These poems act as energy fields of images from science, philosophy, and romantic love. They evoke the spaces of the New Mexican desert, the Alaskan tundra, her Chinese home, and the interior self in relationships, as the poet makes empathy a metaphor for the space of one person inside another. The lines of verse are long, sensuous, and prose-like, following the open horizons of the West.

“Mei-mei Berssenbrugge’s poetry moves from “inner” phenomena to ones coming from the “external” world and back again with breathtaking evenness. Calmly and convincingly she leads our attention from…. confidence or passion or attention itself to ice crystals, gulls fireworks, or apple trees and to very specific qualities of perception, especially vision- most notably, those associated with the properties of light- fogginess, brightness, colors- (what a poet of light she is!)- in poetry that always speaks equally about “the world” and “herself.” She is neither “objectivist” nor “subjectivist” but a poet of the whole consciousness. A virtuoso of the long line, hers- unlike those of most other poets- are startlingly non-rhapsodic, although they are more truly emotional than those of most rhapsodists. I’ve known and loved Mei-mei Berssenbrugge’s poetry for years. It gets better all the time.” -Jackson Mac Low


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Extended Frames

This is the first book of an extraordinary young photographer whose extension of the frame gives the image its play in time and returns it to its connection with Event.

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This is the first book of an extraordinary young photographer whose extension of the frame gives the image its play in time and returns it to its connection with Event. Taking as object the experimental performances of Co-Accident, a Baltimore-based group of poets, musicians, and “theatricians” that is having its own impact on international performance art, Sue Abramson allows the photographic image to register the disciplined free behavior of people moving in light. The result is an amplification of those photographic possibilities opened up and given mastery by the late Barbara Blondeau, and shows that when the fixed image travels beyond the fixed frame it can become both abstract and cinematic. Person is objectified by multiplicity, and object is personified in the specific character of its movement. Eye and mind grow larger together as they interact at the point where hand controls lens. — George Quasha


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Facing the Music

“Magnificent poetry; dark, severe, even harsh — yet pulsating with life.” -John Ashbery

“A poem has to be heard before it is written. Paul Auster hears with his marvelous exactness the tone and modulations of that voice.” -William Bronk

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Faust Foutu

Robert Duncan

Faust Foutu (Faust Screwed) is a satire featuring a mid-20th-century Faust as a bourgeois artist “suffering” for his art. It was first performed by poets and painters in San Francisco in 1955. The book includes drawings by the poet made to accompany the printed text.

“In the early fifties…

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Robert Duncan

Faust Foutu (Faust Screwed) is a satire featuring a mid-20th-century Faust as a bourgeois artist “suffering” for his art. It was first performed by poets and painters in San Francisco in 1955. The book includes drawings by the poet made to accompany the printed text.

“In the early fifties the art of painting was at the cutting edge (Clyfford Still, Pollock, Rothko) — it’s not surprising that this “screwed” Faust is a painter or that a public reading and performance of the piece should have taken place at San Francisco’s most intensely avant garde art gallery, the Six Gallery. It’s no surprise either that the actors in the presentation, seated at a long table on a little dais, should be friends, actors, experimental film-makers, poets, painters, and playwrights. Poet Jack Spicer leaned towards the audience at moments with intensity and almost boyish innocence of expression and near harshness of diction. Larry Jordan, the film-maker, had been encouraged by Duncan to just sing loudly and naturally letting his untrained voice carry Faust’s songs. Painter, and life-friend of Duncan’s, Jess Collins, spoke his lines with immense clarity and irony. The play was being tested on the ear, there was no acting-out as Duncan did in his solo performances, this was to be heard—and, listen, it’s still sounding.” -Michael McClure

Robert Duncan’s “comic masque” Faust Foutu was first performed in 1955 and published in a small edition in 1960 with drawings by the poet, reproduced here in a trade edition.


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Finding the Lamb

In her third book of poems and prose, Rebecca Newth writes with a compelling commitment to the clear perception of her experience as a poet, mother and child.


Flowers of Unceasing Coincidence, The

Returning from India in 1983, haunted by geometric relationships between economies and persons, by images of new ways of being alive that he had seen, Robert Kelly began this long poem…

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Returning from India in 1983, haunted by geometric relationships between economies and persons, by images of new ways of being alive that he had seen, Robert Kelly began this long poem. The Persian Gulf, the oil wars we inhabit, transgression and invasion, are motives as the text tries to escape the false comforts of continuity and reach the space that opens between words.


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Form of Taking It All, A

Rosmarie Waldrop

Just as the discovery of America in the fifteenth century forever altered the way Europeans viewed the world, so too did the theories of relativity and quantum physics radically alter the twentieth-century vision of the universe.

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Rosmarie Waldrop

Just as the discovery of America in the fifteenth century forever altered the way Europeans viewed the world, so too did the theories of relativity and quantum physics radically alter the twentieth-century vision of the universe. Both encounters with otherness, on both a global and personal level, form the crux of Rosmarie Waldrop’s extraordinary novel. The story roams the political worlds of old Mexico and Washington, D.C., and goes on to fuse the two great perceptual revolutions of the fifteenth and twentieth centuries—so that it is Columbus, in her fiction, who discovers the unpredicted particles of the new quantum physics. Waldrop’s brilliant narrative shifts from stream of consciousness to first-person narration to poetry, in a unique meditation on love and politics, conquest and tolerance, and the effects of change.


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From the Desert to the Book

Edmond Jabes Pierre Joris (trans.)

The fate of the individual among disintegrating tradition is a major theme of Edmund Jabes. In this book of literary and philosophical conversations, France’s leading Jewish writer adds an intimate, personal dimension to his formidable 40-year career.

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Edmond Jabes,
Pierre Joris (trans.)

The fate of the individual among disintegrating tradition is a major theme of Edmund Jabes. In this book of literary and philosophical conversations, France’s leading Jewish writer adds an intimate, personal dimension to his formidable 40-year career. Compelling in its inquiry into the fate of reading and writing in our time, it is also profoundly ambiguous, open to a multiplicity of possible readings. This work offers insight of a new kind into this major writer’s growing canon in English—thoughts on his own works combine with stories of his youth in Egypt, his exile in 1956, other writers and artists, the Kabbalah, and projections for a postmodern world.


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Gary Hill: HanD HearD/Liminal Objects

George Quasha and Charles Stein

This essay, discussing a two-part installation at Galerie des Archives in Paris by the internationally celebrated artist, Gary Hill, explores the enigmatic nature of the work of art as an object and of objects in general, as such issues pertain to Hill’s work and these installations in particular.

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George Quasha and Charles Stein

This essay, discussing a two-part installation at Galerie des Archives in Paris by the internationally celebrated artist, Gary Hill, explores the enigmatic nature of the work of art as an object and of objects in general, as such issues pertain to Hill’s work and these installations in particular. The text is by two well-known poet/artists who have a long history of association and collaboration with Gary Hill. This book is handsomely illustrated with photographs of the installation and other relevant works by Hill and is presented in a bilingual, French-English edition.

Excerpts from the text:

“There are works of art that require initiation. This does not mean that they require explanation, special consensus, or any other prescriptive bearing. It does mean that one must discover an _appropriate mode of entry_ which is more than informational. This can involve radical reorientation, as in the case of _HanD HearD_, which directly (but non-coercively) introduces us to the posture of awareness appropriate to our participation in the piece.”

“Considering more particularly the piece _HanD HearD_, we discover that its way of being a text imposes nothing on the mind, yet it offers an _image_ (a hand in front of a person’s face) as a possible _posture_ of awareness. And because the “text” has no “content” other than this posture, it grants the participant _direct access_ from the beginning.”


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Giving the Lily Back Her Hands

This text is a psychotypographic romance caught listening to the voices inside the voice from which it issues. It mates willingly with its Reader, releases quickness & lightness in the marriage of syntax, then returns to…

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This text is a psychotypographic romance caught listening to the voices inside the voice from which it issues. It mates willingly with its Reader, releases quickness & lightness in the marriage of syntax, then returns to the underground where Lily & Hands receive their power to discourse.



Glossodelia Attract

George Quasha

If William Blake’s “Proverbs of Hell” are poetry, then George Quasha’s preverbs are like a close cousin. Its core question is: can poetry say the unsayable? Preverbs wonder: what is poetry? A well established poetic tradition both modern and post-modern—some call it experimental—starts its poetics with: poetry is not what you think it is

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George Quasha

If William Blake’s “Proverbs of Hell” are poetry, then George Quasha’s preverbs are like a close cousin. Its core question is: can poetry say the unsayable? Preverbs wonder: what is poetry? A well established poetic tradition both modern and post-modern—some call it experimental—starts its poetics with: poetry is not what you think it is. Its work is journeying inside language, as if passing through a distant country or else another reality. It conveys news of alternate dimensions showing through in the here-and-now, embedded inside our everyday thoughts and speaking.


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Great Dime Store Centennial, The

Don Byrd

This book is a guide book to the Seven Wonders of the ancient world, seven long solos in a jam session with the dead, an answer to the four great philosophic questions of Immanuel Kant, the song of a barbaric horde, an eavesdropping at the borders of contemporary history, an account of an apocalyptic disco….

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Don Byrd

This book is a guide book to the Seven Wonders of the ancient world, seven long solos in a jam session with the dead, an answer to the four great philosophic questions of Immanuel Kant, the song of a barbaric horde, an eavesdropping at the borders of contemporary history, an account of an apocalyptic disco….And the presiding beings are Beethoven, Napoleon, Sousa, Frank Woolworth, Buddy Bolden, Charlie Parker, and Ludwig Wittgenstein. You are invited to participate. R.S.V.P.

“This powerful act of language is at once a celebration and a moan of dismay. Its theme is the advent of the “Information Society,” and its roots are in both the Western Intellectual traditions and American forms of life. The poem’s seven sections are devoted repsectively to the Seven Wonders of the ancient world, marking the strange persistence of ancient categories of the enigmatic and awesome in the contemporary world.

The accident of the centenary of the founding of the F.W. Woolworth chain provides both the poem’s formal occasion and a “principle” for organizing its detail—a delirious proliferation of artifacts – useful and absurd – arbitrary, fanciful and pragmatic in their arrangement.” – Charles Stein


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Hegel’s Family

Keith Waldrop

Vivid elements evoke remembered scenes or imagined constructions from history, dream or chance. Unlikely characters show up…

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Keith Waldrop

Vivid elements evoke remembered scenes or imagined constructions from history, dream or chance. Unlikely characters show up. A 15th century Dutch painter walks the streets of Providence; a young girl goes to sleep in a dark room; Charlemagne appears in a mythic terrain of sheer language. This is a distinctive poet’s prose, precise and congenial, capturing improbable moments and spinning the mind into new realms of possibility.


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Horse Sacrifice

“Stein has found a channel to his own imagination. When his mind is moving and seizing the gorgeous or gritty images as they wind upward in the spine or shiver from the brain, he carries the reader effortlessly into…

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“Stein has found a channel to his own imagination. When his mind is moving and seizing the gorgeous or gritty images as they wind upward in the spine or shiver from the brain, he carries the reader effortlessly into his discoveries.” – Bill Zavatsky


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Hotel des Archives: A Trilogy

Chris Tysh

Hotel des Archives is a trilogy of books consisting of verse recastings from the French novels of Beckett, Genet and Duras. Synchronous with postmodernism’s aesthetics of appropriation, détournement, sampling and other intertextual strategies, the project operates a double shift of genre and language, since she moves from the original French and from prose to lyric. These transcreations, as Tysh has been calling them, allow her to forsake the traditional mode of self-expression in favor of one that “translates” other cultural materials, creating an artistic network beyond boundaries and temporalities….

Fall 2018

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Chris Tysh

Hotel des Archives is a trilogy of books consisting of verse recastings from the French novels of Beckett, Genet and Duras. Synchronous with postmodernism’s aesthetics of appropriation, détournement, sampling and other intertextual strategies, the project operates a double shift of genre and language, since she moves from the original French and from prose to lyric. These transcreations, as Tysh has been calling them, allow her to forsake the traditional mode of self-expression in favor of one that “translates” other cultural materials, creating an artistic network beyond boundaries and temporalities.

In Molloy, the Flip Side, she uses the French language in which Samuel Beckett wrote his novel Molloy to guide her into finding a contemporary American vernacular through which the hapless narrator speaks. Her three-line stanza formation compresses Beckett’s diegetic universe, sparse as it is, and allows her to link the two texts through the projection of a new, speaking subject — a funny, witty, old and disabled bum, going slowly nowhere.

In Our Lady of the Flowers, Echoic, Jean Genet’s 1943 disturbing elegy for social heterogeneity, she attempts to find a poetic equivalent with which to evoke Divine, Mignon-Dainty-Feet, and the young assassin, Our Lady, three saintly figures in a forbidden realm of the senses. The seven-line stanzas of my Our Lady of the Flowers, Echoic are spacious enough to accommodate the narrative arc, while foregrounding their lyrical impact.

Her third transcreation flows from the novel The Ravishing of Lol V. Stein by Marguerite Duras, the celebrated author of the Hiroshima Mon Amour screenplay and winner of the Goncourt Prize for The Lover. In this type of relational poetics, she strives to maintain the narrative spaces and affects, while finding a new set of porous networks – lyrical trajectories that pass through various signposts of the text.

Fall 2018

ADVANCE PRAISE

Chris Tysh reads in, around, and through Molloy in this ingenious transformation of Beckett’s French prose into compulsively vernacular English tercets. The narrative echoes in Molloy: The Flip Side make for an unsettling familiarity, spiked with the verbal equivalent of dark chocolate and homemade rum.
Charles Bernstein

Like Genet, Tysh is something of a snake charmer—or the snake itself?—lyricism unfolding kaleidoscopically, extending emotions and meanings, fastening this mouse/reader to the spot.
Robert Glück

Chris Tysh’s gorgeous transcreation of Marguerite Duras’s haunted and haunting early novel draws out the lyricism of the text’s emotional algebra almost in the way one might draw poison from a wound. In Tysh’s condensed explorations of betrayal, voyeurism, and imitative desire, one finds a further textual ravishment—a lushly articulated response to Duras’s original that captures both the calculated and explosive qualities of its cry.
Elizabeth Willis


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House Crossing

Laurie Patton

House Crossing is a book of 32 poems about where we live or, more properly, dwell, with each poem entitled by a different attribute of domestic architecture as it is commonly known: Copula, eaves, attic, beams, etc. Such might lend itself to description, but in the vision of poet and scholar Laurie Patton each component becomes alive to an actuality beyond…

Spring 2018

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Laurie Patton

House Crossing is a book of 32 poems about where we live or, more properly, dwell, with each poem entitled by a different attribute of domestic architecture as it is commonly known: Copula, eaves, attic, beams, etc. Such might lend itself to description, but–reminiscent in part of Ronald Johnson’s oeuvre (The Foundations, The Spires, and The Ramparts)–in the vision of poet and scholar Laurie Patton each component becomes alive to an actuality beyond physical construct: The poetics of how we hold our ground, even if it is in flux–or as she writes, “A river runs… below the house.” The instigation for this poetic cycle is Gaston Bachelard’s The Poetics of Space, with this collection a homage to that classic phenomenological analysis. As she writes in her introduction, House Crosing arose as “a straightforward observation about the endurance of Bachelard’s work: if a poetics is good enough, and I believe Bachelard’s is, then it does not only comment on poetry, but can give rise to poetry as well.” What Patton gives rise to is in part an opportunity for us each to live more evocatively in our days and nights in each our own place, building a being, as “Noah’s ark stands / at the end of our hallway.”

Spring 2018


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How Wild?

Linda Crane (1945-2000) was a poet, naturalist, shamanic practitioner, and Zen Buddhist. She was born in Winchester, grew up in Duxbury, and spent most of her adult life in Gloucester, Massachusetts. She published…

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Linda Crane (1945-2000) was a poet, naturalist, shamanic practitioner, and Zen Buddhist. She was born in Winchester, grew up in Duxbury, and spent most of her adult life in Gloucester, Massachusetts. She published two books of poetry (as Linda Parker) during her lifetime: _Graphite_ (Tansy Press 1980) and _Seabirds_ (Fathom Press 1980). She shared her work generously, often typing up fresh copies of poems to give to friends, and was well known throughout the Cape Ann area for both her poetry readings and her shamanic practice. In the late 1990s she wrote and gave public performances of two operas: _Spring_ and _Anacaona_, singing her own compositions. She left a group of manuscripts prepared for publication at her death. _How Wild?_, subtitled in manuscript _She Speaks for Herself_, is the first of these to be published by her estate.


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If There Were Anywhere But Desert

Edmond Jabes and Keith Waldrop, Transl.

This book is the first bilingual selection from the poetic works of Edmund Jabes, long acknowledged for the mastery of his work in the unique prose genre invented by him…

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Edmond Jabes and
Keith Waldrop, Transl.

This book is the first bilingual selection from the poetic works of Edmund Jabes, long acknowledged for the mastery of his work in the unique prose genre invented by him. “Jabes lives in the French language as if it were the Sea,” writes Robert Duncan in the afterword, a truth accessible here both in the French originals and Keith Waldrop’s extraordinary translations, drawn from Jabes’ earliest and most recent poems. “Poetry was Jabes’ proving ground,” writes Paul Auster in the Introduction, “and as a careful reader of Keith Waldrop’s translations will observe, the styles and themes that characterize The Book of Questions and The Book of Resemblances were already being explored by Jabes in the poems he wrote as a young man. One finds the same economy of reference, the same passionate lyricism, the same tendency toward aphorism, and the same preoccupation with the act of writing itself. Even the theme of exile, which plays such a vital part in the later prose books, is already present in these early poems: ‘Always in a foreign country, the poet uses poetry as an interpreter.’” It is impressive to see how much the whole oeuvre of Jabes stands as a continuity and a completion from its first moments to these very recent poems, an inquiry into the nature of writing and being.



Imagine Inventing Yellow

M.C. Richards

M.C. Richards’ CENTERING, published 25 years ago, went on to sell 120,000 copies and became a classic on the melding of spirit and art and the discovery of the self through creativity. This is the first major collection of her richly imagistic poetry…

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M.C. Richards

M.C. Richards’ CENTERING, published 25 years ago, went on to sell 120,000 copies and became a classic on the melding of spirit and art and the discovery of the self through creativity. This is the first major collection of her richly imagistic poetry which combines previous work with new poems written in the past decade. Richards here inquires about the essence and power of the imagination, and advocates viewing the world in images that “make us whole.” “The world will change,” she says, “when we imagine it differently,” This new book includes eight color paintings by Thomas Buechner, with the poems they inspired.


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