Poetry

In the World Enormous

Tomer Inbar

In the World Enormous is engaged in transition, conversation and what transforms. Focused on a time beginning shortly before the death of Tomer Inbar’s mother and ending after the birth of his twin daughters, these poems constitute a speaking out of and about passing and starting….

 

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Tomer Inbar

In the World Enormous is engaged in transition, conversation and what transforms. Focused on a time beginning shortly before the death of Tomer Inbar’s mother and ending after the birth of his twin daughters, these poems constitute a speaking out of and about passing and starting, in plangent energy and restless balances finding words simultaneous to a human intimacy and intensity. In part informed by his study of early Japanese literature, Inbar is open to these poems being read with a loose internal movement and multi-directionality—though within a totality presence inscribes and fi nds in you. Inbar writes, “I fi nd comfort in being present as things move. With sibilance. On their own volition. Taking the qualities of their construction along.” These poems moreover seem to compel us to think an impossible thought.

ADVANCE PRAISE

Tomer Inbar’s meditative, complex work reminds the reader of Hopkins’s “inscapes” and “instresses”—profound encounters, fruits of intense moments of observation, and an enviable musical ear. I am particularly drawn to Inbar’s unusual, even innovative, usage of parentheses throughout this collection. On the one hand, it is what Olson meant by the poet’s ability to “record the listening he has done to his own speech and by that one act indicate how he would want any reader, silently or otherwise, to voice his work.” Moreover, Inbar uses parentheses to draw out the polyphony, worlds-within-worlds, commentary-upon-commentary, workings of the restless mind, as in, memorably: “Taking sticks to the mortuary: wild / Iris (bunches (of fresh tea (mint &) / marjoram (be discreet (she said) I / have neither their leisure nor / cadence) to arrive (in her state) momentarily.”
Jake Marmer

Like the poetry of A.R. Ammons, David Ignatow, George Oppen and Charles Reznikoff, Tomer Inbar’s poems attend to reality’s finest internal and external details. Artifacts of a nimble mind, these poems delight and enlighten. They have the capacity to stun the reader into a heightened state of wakefulness to become partners to the poet’s reality, living on the perpetual edge of witnessing abundance.
Jerry Mirskin

Tomer Inbar moves in careful relation to the enormous world, as if every word is a pearl of great price and the words exchanged between people are the greatest of all. These are poems that move between minds and reveal the deeper structures of thought and emotion that glide beneath the surface. Many of these poems are about human connection, and Inbar is an acute observer of the deeper ways that language opens fields of meaning between us … the beauty of a child’s mind, and all of the spaces that exist between thoughts, sounds, animals, museums, and the words we pass between each other.
Kristin Prevallet


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Into Stillness

Cheryl Pallant

Engaging a rhythmic propulsion similar to that of the poet’s first book, Into Stillness offers a compelling meditation on the sacredness of the body in the shadow of atrocity…

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Cheryl Pallant

Engaging a rhythmic propulsion similar to that of the poet’s first book, Into Stillness offers a compelling meditation on the sacredness of the body in the shadow of atrocity. Her kinetic poetry swirls historical fragments with dream, memory, flesh, violence, human and ecstasy. With the flow of prose and the luminous interruptivity of poetry, Into Stillness explores the tension between self and other, existence and death, the word and its silence. The prose-like poems erupt from an innate yet unexplainable knowledge, surprising linguistically with their twists of meaning, landing in unexpected shapes and senses.

“Into Stillness is a death-defying act of language and imagination. An audacious, fluid living thing.” – Carole Maso

“Cheryl Pallant’s poems are remarkably attuned to the ever-changing relationship between language and the human body. She doesn’t describe experience so much as activate it, make it move as we move, close to others or away, close to ourselves or anguished by the gap between our desires and what we’ll let ourselves know of them. The poems of Into Stillness are explorations, not explanations, they are poems of process, of switching, of defeat and the return from defeat, of dissolution and the determination, always, to stand where it’s necessary to stand.” – Mark Wallace


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In|Filtration: An Anthology of Innovative Poetry from the Hudson River Valley

Anne Gorrick & Sam Truitt

In|Filtration is an anthology of contemporary Hudson Valley poetry that in one sense or another is innovative. The poets’ work is sometimes formally original and other times innovative in the use of more familiar poetic forms: old bottle/new wine; new bottle/old wine; and, quite often, new bottle/new wine. Much of the poetry here is directly or indirectly in conversation with national and international movements directed toward more exploratory uses of the medium…

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Anne Gorrick & Sam Truitt, Editors

In|Filtration is an anthology of contemporary Hudson Valley poetry that in one sense or another is innovative. The poets’ work is sometimes formally original and other times innovative in the use of more familiar poetic forms: old bottle/new wine; new bottle/old wine; and, quite often, new bottle/new wine. Much of the poetry here is directly or indirectly in conversation with national and international movements directed toward more exploratory uses of the medium—work that goes beyond the explorer’s map into uncharted territories, places where the map tatters in the explorer’s pocket and another world begins. Like explorers the editors have sought to map the contemporary currents of radical poetics in the Hudson Valley. There is truly an enormous wealth of poetic activity in the region, and of course such an exploration cannot be comprehensive Themselves poets, the editors present what they take to be the salient characteristic of the region in their essay “A Hudson Valley Salt Line” at the end of the anthology, pointing to the geological, human and cultural histories of the Hudson Valley as they dovetail with its poetries. They also provide their rationale for the title In|Filtration with particular reference to the Hudson River’s salt line, which becomes the essay’s key trope.


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Irons in the Fire

Nor Hall

This book is described by Nor Hall as “a praise-piece to duplicitous metal-artful and harrowing-and to its handlers”…

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Nor Hall

This book is described by Nor Hall as “a praise-piece to duplicitous metal-artful and harrowing-and to its handlers.” Part One, “Irons in the Fire,” is a prose character sketch of iron and iron workers, “the people who work iron and can’t keep their hands off it.” These are strangely passionate people (the real “Iron Johns” and “Janes”!) with “a compulsion to adore that binds them in an essential community of iron men and ferrous women.” Offering a history, mythology, and psychology of the element iron, both alchemical and industrial, this work is a major addition to the tradition of non-dogmatic psychological commentary on myth that includes Jung, Bachelard, and James Hillman, to which Hall adds a profoundly feminist dimension.

Author of the classic feminist work The Moon and the Virgin, Nor Hall writes her own visionary, erotic, psychotherapy as a mythopoetics. In this new work she draws new meaning from world mythology, particularly Yoruban Vodoun, and the Greek myths surrounding Vulcan (Hephaestus). Her psychological insight and literary flare illuminate a subject that, though rarely discussed, lies at the root of industrial modernity and its connection with contemporary art and imagination. Part Two, an extended poetic work called “The End of the Iron Age,” is “one woman’s love song & fear song: an epic ode to matters of a lifetime out of which iron’s images extrude.” Borrowing a structural principle from W. C. Williams’ Paterson, yet ground breaking in its own right, it takes the poetic impulse back to its epic roots, speaking beyond literature as such, straight to the human psyche at large.

“Everything Nor Hall touches turns to gold.” – Norman O. Brown

“Real & profound, “aroused by metal,” there is always a woman in the fire!” – Anne Waldman

“Nor Hall has culled new flowers from old vines. The myths and their figures are familiar—but her way of being with her symbols is fresh, bold, and especially sensitive.” – James Hillman


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Let Me Be Los

A guided reading of Finnegan’s Wake, with 135 illustrations, showing the book’s simple and elegant pattern inspired in Joyce by two visionary cosmologies: the poetic Prophecies of William Blake and the Egyptian Myth of Osiris…

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Frances Phipps

A guided reading of Finnegan’s Wake, with 135 illustrations, showing the book’s simple and elegant pattern inspired in Joyce by two visionary cosmologies: the poetic Prophecies of William Blake and the Egyptian Myth of Osiris.

In this book Frances Phipps has marshalled an impressive array of primary and scholarly/critical resources that provide exciting, often eccentric, but always illuminating perspectives on the complex relations between Blake and Joyce. Recognizing both the limitations and the possibilities of typography and visual illustrations, Phipps has converted these dimensions of conventional bookmaking into a veritable kaleidoscope of Egyptian iconography, explanatory diagrams, and imaginative juxtapositions of texts in an unprecedented book form, whose appearance should be seen as a major publishing event.” -Donald Ault, author of Visionary Physics: Blake’s Response to Newton and Narrative Unbound: Re-Visioning Blake’s THE FOUR ZOAS

“Through her ingenious explication and illustration of the cosmologies of William Blake and the Osiris myth of ancient Egypt, Frances Phipps reveals the formal mysteries of Joyce’s great dreambook as being founded in the notion of Contraries. She states that, while Finnegan’s Wake does not copy Blake, it establishes Joyce’s own “myth of the history of the world as representing a battle of contraries in which he used the Egyptian religion….” Whereas the Egyptians had Osiris and Blake had Albion, Joyce had the Irish mythological giant Finn and his mundane form of Tim Finnegan. And whereas the contraries of Night and Day, Darkness and Light, are necessarily embattled in Egyptian and Blakean systems, Joyce also historicized this perpetual cosmic strife in terms of the Battle of Contrarf, with Danes versus Celts, the result of which was Dublin, his micro-cosm.

For this newly explicated approach to the structure of Finnegan’s Wake, Phipp’s study deserves to have its place on the shelf of every serious Joycean alongside such classic commentaries as those of Clive Hart and Adaline Glasheen.” -Alison Armstrong, Irish Literary Supplement, Author of The Joyce of Cooking and co-editor of James Joyce Broadsheet and I.L.S.


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Letargo

Frank Samperi is that rare poet for whom an encompassing vision gives source and authority to an ongoing life work. Book after book unfolds, precise and on-center, as though it had been there, in careful plan, from…

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Frank Samperi is that rare poet for whom an encompassing vision gives source and authority to an ongoing life work. Book after book unfolds, precise and on-center, as though it had been there, in careful plan, from the beginning. And yet it is open, with inspired oversteppings of known boundaries. “Its difficulty,” writes Cid Corman, “is the difficulty of human being in the light of divinity.”

_Letargo_ is the last book of an extended volume called


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Lich Gate, The

Clayton Eshelman is the author of numerous books including Indiana, Altars, The Gull Wall, and What She Means. Formerly editor of Caterpillar, he has translated extensively from Spanish and French and…

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Clayton Eshelman is the author of numerous books including Indiana, Altars, The Gull Wall, and What She Means. Formerly editor of Caterpillar, he has translated extensively from Spanish and French and is co-recipient of the 1979 National Book Award for translation.

_The Lich Gate_ is a book of violent and percussive verse that drives the examination of bodily and mythic experience through the heart of its own impasse.

The included poem, “Lich Gate” begins

Waiting, the dead rests in the waiting gate.
The gate waits for the preacher
to come up and what

shape of the bell shrine
I sat in a dead man waiting
for what touch of
understanding rayed back across Kyoto
back across ocean to wonder
my mother father
grey, moving to barbecue 1962,
I say in the lich gate a belless shrine,
corpseless, bunched up on a crossbeam waiting.


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Liner Notes

Andy Mister

Liner Notes is a semi-narrative prose poem, a meditation on alienation and pop culture. Beginning with the Beach Boy’s unfinished masterpiece “Smile”, Mister describes a world populated by ghosts. Adrift on a sea of drug use, boredom and popular entertainment, Mister traces his relationship to the obsessive collection of ephemera and the coterminous feelings of isolation and loss.

Huffington Post Review by Seth Abramson

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Andy Mister

Liner Notes is a semi-narrative prose poem, a meditation on alienation and pop culture. Beginning with the Beach Boy’s unfinished masterpiece “Smile”, Mister describes a world populated by ghosts. Adrift on a sea of drug use, boredom and popular entertainment, Mister traces his relationship to the obsessive collection of ephemera and the coterminous feelings of isolation and loss. Like an iPod on shuffle, lyrical descriptions of urban landscapes and memories of failed relationships mix with song lyrics and deadpan anecdotes of death, failure. In the end a life, like the book itself, is assembled from the detritus of pop culture. As he writes, “Each billboard is a monument to our ability to believe in anything, at least for a moment. Then it’s gone.” But belief’s shadow remains, amid the news of a world shot full of holes, which Liner Notes’ hauntings seem to delineate like the chalk figure at the center of every homicide scene we’ve ever imagined ourselves appearing within… “There’ll probably be some music there, lining your eyelids.”

I love the blunt care for real time, with all its gaps & noises & bends, Andy Mister takes in the searching, powerful scroll of paragraphs that make up Liner Notes. Working through the implied vision of an undecided note taker prone to stark assertions and excavating insights to perception, Mister puts songs at the heart of his relationship to language & digs away at the disappearances they reflect in their, and his, histories. “The world becomes boring when you brush away the detritus” says the same mind that listens to own its aloneness, & desires, evenly, “to dissolve each distance in distance”. —Anselm Berrigan

Andy Mister’s loving and disturbing “notes” create a complex harmony (sympathy) between public noise and private revelation. In the midst of Liner Notes we read: “Childhood is a song I can barely remember the words to. They only come back to me when I am thinking of something else.” that something else is at the heart of this compelling and magical book. Listen! —Peter Gizzi

Jim Carroll’s “People Who Died” comes immediately to mind, but Liner Notes has more in common with David Markson’s late books or with Frank O’Hara’s “Hatred” than with any pop song. What’s most evident, though, is that Andy Mister cares for his readers by caring about his subject. He’s your friend, and he’s alive. —Graham Foust

I had forgotten with what feverishness I used to study the back jackets of my LPs. Was I seeking to understand my desire? The sadness of desolate beauty? The sensitive youth’s love affair with death? It’s all here—as breathless and disarmingly self-conscious as the sweetest parking-lot kiss. I love this book. —Jennifer Moxley

Huffington Post Review by Seth Abramson

Fanzine review and interview

Volta Pick by Eli Noah Gordon

Boston Review appearance of Liner Notes

Sink Review of Liner NotesFall 2013 


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Madness of the Day, The

Jacques Derrida writes of The Madness of the Day that it is “a story whose title runs wild and drives the reader mad…

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Maurice Blanchot

Jacques Derrida writes of this book that it is “a story whose title runs wild and drives the reader mad…la folie du jour, the madness of today, of the day today, which leads to the madness that comes from the day, is born of it, as well as the madness of the day itself, itself mad….La folie du jour is a story of madness, of that madness that consists in seeing the light, vision or visibility, to see beyond what is visible, is not merely ‘to have a vision’ in the usual sense of the word, but to see-beyond-sight, to see-sight-beyond-sight….The story obscures the sun…with a blinding light.” – Jacques Derrida (in Deconstruction and Criticism)


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Marchen Cycle, The

Bruce McClelland

By the author of The Dracula Poems, this cycle continues McClelland’s involvement with archetypal motifs, this time centered specifically on the Indo-Germnic tales collected by the Grimms…

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Bruce McClelland

By the author of The Dracula Poems, this cycle continues McClelland’s involvement with archetypal motifs, this time centered specifically on the Indo-Germnic tales collected by the Grimms. Each concerns a tale or folk-mythic theme, some more available than others, & each intentionally avoids mere retelling, but chooses rather to articulate the salient dynamics of the particular story. The cycle means as well to get past the trap of interpretation—as the Prelude says, “these stories are not therapies”—for to interpret, in this case, is to deny the activity of the imagination looking at its own history. The result is an arrangement of lyric poems, each capable of standing alone, yet together forming a reasonable narrative of that process known as individuation, with the Wolf doing the talking.


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Memories, Dreams and Inner Voices

Michael Ruby

In Memories, Dreams and Inner Voices, the poet Michael Ruby records three strands of our most elusive experiences:  The involuntary memories of bygone times and places that day and night flash across our minds; the mysterious inner voices heard in the last seconds before sleep; and the imaginary experiences called dreams, most of which we forget on waking….

 

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Michael Ruby

In Memories, Dreams and Inner Voices, the poet Michael Ruby records three strands of our most elusive experiences: The involuntary memories of bygone times and places that day and night flash across our minds; the mysterious inner voices heard in the last seconds before sleep; and the imaginary experiences called dreams, most of which we forget on waking. Fleeting Memories and the hypnagogic Inner Voices Heard Before Sleep, the first and third books of this trilogy, are among the first literary forays into two unsounded terrains of consciousness; while the second book, the hyperrealist Dreams of the 1990s, joins the dream books of such French writers as Leiris and Perec, and the Americans Kerouac and Burroughs. Taken together, Ruby’s trilogy is a unique fusion of personal history, fiction and poetry that not only rescues unplumbed psychic experience, but also exults in the laughter, terror and baffling innuendos of unbidden utterance. With an uncanny ability to elicit our own most elusive moments of consciousness, this book is an instigation and guidebook for readers in their own explorations of the psyche.


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Narrative Unbound

Foreword by George Quasha

Narrative Unbound is the first full-scale interpretation of the verbal text of Blake’s most complex long poetic prophecy, “The Four Zoas”…

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Donald Ault
Foreword by George Quasha

Narrative Unbound is the first full-scale interpretation of the verbal text of Blake’s most complex long poetic prophecy, “The Four Zoas.” Never engraved or published in the poet/artist’s lifetime, the poem remains in a single manuscript, apparently unfinished and heavily revised, yet widely celebrated as one of Blake’s most powerful narrative works. Ault challenges the view that the poem is intrinsically incomplete and flawed, arguing instead that the famous difficulties of the text are aspects of Blake’s transformative narrative strategies. By respecting the integrity of Blake’s work, taking every written mark on the page as potentially functional, Ault shows how the intricate interweaving of narrative patterns and interruptions are instrumental to conscious reading. The poetic intent is nothing less than a complete renovation of the reading experience, the potential of which is the realization of what Blake has called “Four-fold vision.” Ault’s approach serves as a guide both to reading “The Four Zoas” and to participating in a radical poetic method. Narrative Unbound engages in the inquiry of contemporary poetics: how is it that altered processes of reading can restructure consciousness?

“This book will be a great delight—and help – to anyone deep in Blake studies; a comfort and aid to the beginning scholar.”-David V. Erdman, author of Blake: Prophet Against Empire and editor of The Complete Poetry and Prose of William Blake

“Donald Ault is probably the most innovative Blake critic in the country.” – Jerome J. McGann, author of The Romantic Ideology

“Ault’s marginal glosses and illuminating diagrams evoke a sense of respect for dedication to the book as artifact…the book…is a powerful picture of reading.” – Nelson Hilton, author of Literal Imagination: Blake’s Vision of Words


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Nigredo

RARE BOOK

Nigredo explores the interfaces of personal and archetypal imagery through the root metaphors of alchemy….

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Nigredo explores the interfaces of personal and archetypal imagery through the root metaphors of alchemy. Stan Brakhage writes: “The poems cast shadows much beyond any first-reading comprehension and thus hopefully into the multiplicity of language means – yet its roots are clearly in necessity (the dance not at all academic). Bravo!”


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On Blank Pages

Peter Van Riper

RARE BOOK

On Blank Pages consists of thought/poems bound by the cover of the “Young Fluxus” catalogue.

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Peter Van Riper

On Blank Pages consists of thought/poems bound by the cover of the “Young Fluxus” catalogue. Each of the artists in that exhibition received a blank catalogue and it is on one of these that this book was written.


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Once Five Years Pass

Federico Garcia Lorca

This is the first English Language edition of the late plays of Lorca, bilingual with celebrated translations, here in paperback for the first time…

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Federico Garcia Lorca

This is the first English Language edition of the late plays of Lorca, bilingual with celebrated translations, here in paperback for the first time. This is the definitive Spanish (as well as English) text of plays which the great Spanish playwright and poet regarded as his most important contribution to the theater. Once Five Years Pass, weaving the influences of modernist theater, the silent film, and commedia dell’arte, has been praised for its power and vitality, and for creating a new species of dream play. Also included are four newly translated, dramatic works from the same period: Buster Keaton’s Rise, The Maiden, The Sailor and the Student, Chimera, and For This Trip to the Moon (a film script). This edition also includes fifteen original drawings by Lorca.



Operas & Plays

Stein considered this her definitive statement for the opera and the theater, yet, incredibly, Operas and Plays has remained out of print for half a century and has become so rare that even scholars read it in Xerox…

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Gertrude Stein

Stein considered this her definitive statement for the opera and the theater, yet, incredibly, Operas and Plays has remained out of print for half a century and has become so rare that even scholars read it in Xerox. Now reprinted for the first time since she published it herself in Paris (Plain Editions, 1932), Operas & Plays contains the most important of Gertrude Stein’s extraordinary contribution to the literature of opera and theater. One of America’s most influential writers—and most famous expatriates – she represents the fusion of modernism and postmodernism in these “word plays.” This book contains twenty different pieces virtually all of which have been out of print for decades. It includes the original version of the opera “Four Saints in Three Acts” (1927), set by Virgil Thompson, as well as “A Lyrical Opera Made by Two” (1928), “Saints and Singing” (1922), “Reread Another” (1921), “The Five Georges” (1931), and two movie treatments, among others.


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Orexis

Kenneth Irby

Two long & short pieces amply presented in 8” x 10” format…

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Kenneth Irby

Two long & short pieces amply presented in 8” x 10” format.

“Irby’s verse is paratactic patchwork, a sewing of memory and hunger, calling forth secret recurrences and the secret of recurrence: occulted genealogies of the kinless garden flowers.” – Charles Stein


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Out of the Question: Selected Poems (1963-2003)

Lewis Warsh

Out of the Question: Selected Poems 1963-2003 gathers together a generous sample of work from Lewis Warsh’s many earlier collections. Warsh has been associated with the community of New York School writers who first met at The Poetry Project in Manhattan in the late 1960s, but as poet Forrest Gander writes, in a review of Warsh’s book Inseparable, “his influence has been felt nationally and internationally”….

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Lewis Warsh

Out of the Question: Selected Poems 1963-2003 gathers together a generous sample of work from Lewis Warsh’s many earlier collections. Warsh has been associated with the community of New York School writers who first met at The Poetry Project in Manhattan in the late 1960s, but as poet Forrest Gander writes, in a review of Warsh’s book Inseparable, “his influence has been felt nationally and internationally.” Out of the Question includes two long poems: The Suicide Rates, first published in 1967, and The Corset, which appeared in 1986. Novelist Paul Auster described The Corset as “not a poem so much as a new way of seeing the world. There is a stunning intelligence at work here, a fierce, deadpan wit that disturbs and enlightens in equal measure.” Auster’s comment can be applied to all of Warsh’s ongoing experiments, as both a poet and a fiction writer, and Out of the Question is the best possible introduction to anyone unfamiliar with his multi-layered body of work.


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Parts and Other Parts

This collection of poems, interwoven with Stein’s distinctive photographs, comprises three separate texts written between 1973 and 1975, “A Book of Confusions,” “Parts,” and “Point Sphynx.”
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Charles Stein

This collection of poems, interwoven with Stein’s distinctive photographs, comprises three separate texts written between 1973 and 1975, “A Book of Confusions,” “Parts,” and “Point Sphynx.”


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Piece of Cake

Bernadette Mayer & Lewis Warsh

Bernadette Mayer and Lewis Warsh wrote Piece of Cake as a work of collaborative prose poetry, based on a process of each writing on alternate days in the course of August of 1976—the bicentennial year of the America’s Declaration of Independence. It recounts the quotidian details of daily activities, negotiating the exigencies of young, married-with-children life, the artistic path and citizenship …

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Bernadette Mayer & Lewis Warsh

Bernadette Mayer and Lewis Warsh wrote Piece of Cake as a work of collaborative prose poetry, based on a process of each writing on alternate days in the course of August of 1976—the bicentennial year of the America’s Declaration of Independence. It recounts the quotidian details of daily activities, negotiating the exigencies of young, married-with-children life, the artistic path and citizenship. It has the classic “I did this, I did that” of a New York School of Poetry text, as characterized by the poetry of Frank O’Hara, and is somewhat reminiscent of Mayer’s work Studying Hunger Journal, written not long before taking up Piece of Cake. Another distinguishing feature of this work is that it is arguably the first significant male-female collaboration in 20th century American poetry. Regarding the possible derivation of the work’s title, and exemplary of the work’s tenor, is the start of Warsh’s entry of August 29: “I also recall getting up and eating a piece of left-over cake (a very sweet store-bought cake with green or possibly pinkish icing) and drinking a glass of milk at the kitchen window. Empty streets, no moon. Michael and Twinkie asleep on the floor of Bernadette’s room, Guy and Karen in mine, Bill on the couch in the living room. Marie in her crib. Everyone ‘dead to the world,’ a phrase I dislike, what a full house.”


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Porphyry On The Cave of the Nymphs

Robert D. Lamberton

A unique survival of ancient hermeneutical literature, this essay reveals the allegorical implications of Chapter 13 in the Odyssey. The Neo-Platonist Porphyry gives us invaluable insight into the way Homer was read in antiquity…

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Robert D. Lamberton

A unique survival of ancient hermeneutical literature, this essay reveals the allegorical implications of Chapter 13 in the Odyssey. The Neo-Platonist Porphyry gives us invaluable insight into the way Homer was read in antiquity. This is the first publication of a new annotated translation from the Greek by Robert Lamberton, a poet, classics scholar, film critic, naturalist, and translator of both ancient and contemporary literature.

Robert Duncan writes, “Robert Lamberton’s study and translation has at last brought us this volume… long needs to stand beside the work of the Platonist Thomas Taylor. He has cast light from a new hermeneutics, the heritage of sciences of the soul since Taylor’s time, a work that will open the Way again.”


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Position & Relation

This lovely book of poems, written in Woodstock, NY, carries inspiration from various places. The book, prefaced by “12 Poems That Were Never Written,” is divided into three sections, “Natural Megaron,” “Preposition Poems,” and “Lung Poems,” corresponding to three distinctive methods Radfar…

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This lovely book of poems, written in Woodstock, NY, carries inspiration from various places. The book, prefaced by “12 Poems That Were Never Written,” is divided into three sections, “Natural Megaron,” “Preposition Poems,” and “Lung Poems,” corresponding to three distinctive methods Radfar used to write her way into time and space: settling down with her journal on a hilly overlook after a thirty minute walk; removing prepositions while still managing to talk about her relation to space; writing at a fixed time in the middle of the night. In going as far as she can in each of these disparate directions, she summons with a surprising degree of certitude a sense of how this specific place once affected her writing and her life.

Paperback with vellum dust jacket.

Advance Praise for Position & Relation:

“In an ongoing fascination that unfolds from the rhythms of Breathe (2004), India Radfar explores in Position & Relation the expanses of the in-between: the perplexing space between the poem and the writing of the poem, the unpredictable landscapes between the I and the you, the relational void between words, and the recurring elisions of wakefulness. It is a stunning inquiry into what has “no explanation / sliding like a cloud between.” – Lila Zemborain

“These are meditative and graceful poems, ones that explore both the where of position and the next to of relation. They are full of the hopes that define both absence and adjacency. ” – Juliana Spahr

“These poems are delicate cloaks of human language, so fresh and open the breeze blows right through.” – Eleni Sikelianos


$15.95List Price:

Ranger CXXII and CXXVIII

OUT OF PRINT

Theodore Enslin

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OUT OF PRINT